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Niche coevolution in consumer–resource communities

Ripa, Jörgen LU ; Storlind, Lena LU ; Lundberg, Per LU and Brown, Joel S. (2009) In Evolutionary Ecology Research 11(2). p.305-323
Abstract
Problem: Niche co-evolution deals simultaneously with the number and the character of species within a community. How can a community of predators and prey adaptively radiate to fill available niches? How many niches are there? And, can adaptive speciation at evolutionary

branching points successfully fill the niches of the ESS?



Model features: We use a predator–prey model with one fitness-generating function, a G-function, for the prey and a separate one for the predators. Species diversity can emerge from within and between the two G-functions. Two niche-breadth parameters (prey niche breadth

and predator niche breadth) determine the number of prey and predator species at the ESS.



... (More)
Problem: Niche co-evolution deals simultaneously with the number and the character of species within a community. How can a community of predators and prey adaptively radiate to fill available niches? How many niches are there? And, can adaptive speciation at evolutionary

branching points successfully fill the niches of the ESS?



Model features: We use a predator–prey model with one fitness-generating function, a G-function, for the prey and a separate one for the predators. Species diversity can emerge from within and between the two G-functions. Two niche-breadth parameters (prey niche breadth

and predator niche breadth) determine the number of prey and predator species at the ESS.



Mathematical method: To identify the ESS community for a given pair of niche parameters, we use a numerical approach. All possible strategies can invade at all times. We also apply adaptive dynamics, adaptive speciation, and the invasion of completely novel species to see how a starting community of a single prey and a single predator species can radiate to become the

ESS community.



Conclusion: In the absence of speciation or species invasions, adaptive dynamics cause the existing species to evolve to convergent stable niche archetypes. These archetypes may be local ESS strategies or evolutionary branching points (i.e. convergent stable fitness minima). Initially, adaptive speciation at branching points suffices to increase diversity from one set of niche

archetypes to the next. On approaching the ESS community, speciation at one trophic level makes possible further diversification at the other trophic level. The final species to complete an ESS community may require invasions from species with quite different strategy values to those present in the community. In the state space of prey and predator niche breadth, we can plot

regions of iso-diversity for the ESS communities of prey and predators. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
adaptive radiation, co-evolution, evolutionarily stable strategy, evolutionary dynamics, fitness-generating function, niche archetypes, niche co-evolution, species diversity.
in
Evolutionary Ecology Research
volume
11
issue
2
pages
305 - 323
publisher
Evolutionary Ecology Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000268159600013
ISSN
1522-0613
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9c5751b6-d6ff-46fb-b33e-cb659e27354b (old id 1454535)
date added to LUP
2009-08-10 15:01:23
date last changed
2016-04-15 22:58:27
@article{9c5751b6-d6ff-46fb-b33e-cb659e27354b,
  abstract     = {Problem: Niche co-evolution deals simultaneously with the number and the character of species within a community. How can a community of predators and prey adaptively radiate to fill available niches? How many niches are there? And, can adaptive speciation at evolutionary<br/><br>
branching points successfully fill the niches of the ESS?<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Model features: We use a predator–prey model with one fitness-generating function, a G-function, for the prey and a separate one for the predators. Species diversity can emerge from within and between the two G-functions. Two niche-breadth parameters (prey niche breadth<br/><br>
and predator niche breadth) determine the number of prey and predator species at the ESS.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Mathematical method: To identify the ESS community for a given pair of niche parameters, we use a numerical approach. All possible strategies can invade at all times. We also apply adaptive dynamics, adaptive speciation, and the invasion of completely novel species to see how a starting community of a single prey and a single predator species can radiate to become the<br/><br>
ESS community.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusion: In the absence of speciation or species invasions, adaptive dynamics cause the existing species to evolve to convergent stable niche archetypes. These archetypes may be local ESS strategies or evolutionary branching points (i.e. convergent stable fitness minima). Initially, adaptive speciation at branching points suffices to increase diversity from one set of niche<br/><br>
archetypes to the next. On approaching the ESS community, speciation at one trophic level makes possible further diversification at the other trophic level. The final species to complete an ESS community may require invasions from species with quite different strategy values to those present in the community. In the state space of prey and predator niche breadth, we can plot<br/><br>
regions of iso-diversity for the ESS communities of prey and predators.},
  author       = {Ripa, Jörgen and Storlind, Lena and Lundberg, Per and Brown, Joel S.},
  issn         = {1522-0613},
  keyword      = {adaptive radiation,co-evolution,evolutionarily stable strategy,evolutionary dynamics,fitness-generating function,niche archetypes,niche co-evolution,species diversity.},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {305--323},
  publisher    = {Evolutionary Ecology Ltd},
  series       = {Evolutionary Ecology Research},
  title        = {Niche coevolution in consumer–resource communities},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2009},
}