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Polybrominated diphenyl ethers at a solid waste incineration plant II: atmospheric deposition

ter Schure, Arnout LU ; Agrell, Cecilia LU ; Bokenstrand, A; Sveder, J; Larsson, Per LU and Zegers, BN (2004) In Atmospheric Environment 38(30). p.5149-5155
Abstract
In the second of two papers, the atmospheric polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) deposition (wet and dry) at a municipal solid waste incineration (MSW) plant with electronics recycling is compared with that at an industrial urban reference site (URS) producing asphalt and concrete. Results of BDE209 and SigmaPBDE excluding BDE209 as representatives of "new" vs. "old" PBDEs are presented. Volume weighted mean SigmaPBDE and BDE209 concentrations at the MSW were 6.2 and 14.4 ng l(-1), and at the URS were 2.5 and 14.1 ng l(-1). Median SigmaPBDE and BDE209 deposition fluxes were 21.3, 63.8 and 7.0, 14.7 ng m(-2) day(-1) at the MSW and URS, respectively. The concentrations in precipitation and the deposition fluxes were significantly higher at... (More)
In the second of two papers, the atmospheric polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) deposition (wet and dry) at a municipal solid waste incineration (MSW) plant with electronics recycling is compared with that at an industrial urban reference site (URS) producing asphalt and concrete. Results of BDE209 and SigmaPBDE excluding BDE209 as representatives of "new" vs. "old" PBDEs are presented. Volume weighted mean SigmaPBDE and BDE209 concentrations at the MSW were 6.2 and 14.4 ng l(-1), and at the URS were 2.5 and 14.1 ng l(-1). Median SigmaPBDE and BDE209 deposition fluxes were 21.3, 63.8 and 7.0, 14.7 ng m(-2) day(-1) at the MSW and URS, respectively. The concentrations in precipitation and the deposition fluxes were significantly higher at the MSW compared to the URS. Measured total washout- ratios (W-T) were dependent on particle scavenging and the median WT for all congeners was 5.4x 10(5). Median dry particle deposition velocities ranged from 0.4 to 49 cm s(-1), depending on congener, showing that PBDEs are effectively removed from the atmosphere by particle deposition. PBDE fluxes increased at the reference site when winds were blowing from west south-west, i.e. from the direction of the MSW. PBDE deposition and washout ratios were not influenced by temperature or rain volume, suggesting a constant emission from the MSW regardless of weather conditions. Together with the results of paper I (Agrell et al., 2004, Atmospheric Environment, this issue) we therefore suggest that treatment of waste, e.g. electronics recycling, is more a source of "old" PBDEs to the environment, whereas the rather similar BDE209 concentrations at the two urban sites are more a result of proximity to potential diffuse sources. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Atmospheric Environment
volume
38
issue
30
pages
5149 - 5155
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000223804400015
  • scopus:8544258805
ISSN
1352-2310
DOI
10.1016/j.atmosenv.2004.05.025
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4d41ab37-e2a9-4212-9a46-d2ff55c81b30 (old id 146186)
date added to LUP
2007-06-27 15:33:06
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:29:36
@article{4d41ab37-e2a9-4212-9a46-d2ff55c81b30,
  abstract     = {In the second of two papers, the atmospheric polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) deposition (wet and dry) at a municipal solid waste incineration (MSW) plant with electronics recycling is compared with that at an industrial urban reference site (URS) producing asphalt and concrete. Results of BDE209 and SigmaPBDE excluding BDE209 as representatives of "new" vs. "old" PBDEs are presented. Volume weighted mean SigmaPBDE and BDE209 concentrations at the MSW were 6.2 and 14.4 ng l(-1), and at the URS were 2.5 and 14.1 ng l(-1). Median SigmaPBDE and BDE209 deposition fluxes were 21.3, 63.8 and 7.0, 14.7 ng m(-2) day(-1) at the MSW and URS, respectively. The concentrations in precipitation and the deposition fluxes were significantly higher at the MSW compared to the URS. Measured total washout- ratios (W-T) were dependent on particle scavenging and the median WT for all congeners was 5.4x 10(5). Median dry particle deposition velocities ranged from 0.4 to 49 cm s(-1), depending on congener, showing that PBDEs are effectively removed from the atmosphere by particle deposition. PBDE fluxes increased at the reference site when winds were blowing from west south-west, i.e. from the direction of the MSW. PBDE deposition and washout ratios were not influenced by temperature or rain volume, suggesting a constant emission from the MSW regardless of weather conditions. Together with the results of paper I (Agrell et al., 2004, Atmospheric Environment, this issue) we therefore suggest that treatment of waste, e.g. electronics recycling, is more a source of "old" PBDEs to the environment, whereas the rather similar BDE209 concentrations at the two urban sites are more a result of proximity to potential diffuse sources. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {ter Schure, Arnout and Agrell, Cecilia and Bokenstrand, A and Sveder, J and Larsson, Per and Zegers, BN},
  issn         = {1352-2310},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {30},
  pages        = {5149--5155},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Atmospheric Environment},
  title        = {Polybrominated diphenyl ethers at a solid waste incineration plant II: atmospheric deposition},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2004.05.025},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2004},
}