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Marital status, social capital, material conditions and self-rated health: A population-based study.

Lindström, Martin LU (2009) In Health Policy 93. p.172-179
Abstract
AIMS: Associations between marital status and self-rated health were investigated, adjusting for material conditions and trust (social capital). METHODS: The 2004 public-health survey in Skåne is a cross-sectional study. A total of 27,757 persons aged 18-80 years answered a postal questionnaire, which represents 59% of the random sample. A logistic regression model was used to investigate associations between marital status and self-rated health, adjusting for economic problems and trust. RESULTS: The prevalence of poor self-rated health was 28.7% among men and 33.2% among women. Older respondents, respondents born abroad, with medium/low education, low emotional support, low instrumental support, economic problems, low trust, never... (More)
AIMS: Associations between marital status and self-rated health were investigated, adjusting for material conditions and trust (social capital). METHODS: The 2004 public-health survey in Skåne is a cross-sectional study. A total of 27,757 persons aged 18-80 years answered a postal questionnaire, which represents 59% of the random sample. A logistic regression model was used to investigate associations between marital status and self-rated health, adjusting for economic problems and trust. RESULTS: The prevalence of poor self-rated health was 28.7% among men and 33.2% among women. Older respondents, respondents born abroad, with medium/low education, low emotional support, low instrumental support, economic problems, low trust, never married and divorced had significantly higher odds ratios of poor self-rated health than their respective reference group. Low trust was significantly higher among the divorced and unmarried compared to the married/cohabitating. Adjustment for economic problems but not for trust reduced the odds ratios of poor self-rated health among the divorced, which became not significant among men. CONCLUSIONS: Never married and the divorced have significantly higher age-adjusted odds ratios of poor self-rated health than the married/cohabitating group. Economic problems but not trust seem to affect the association between marital status and poor self-rated health. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Health Policy
volume
93
pages
172 - 179
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000272294400013
  • pmid:19692141
  • scopus:70350589134
ISSN
1872-6054
DOI
10.1016/j.healthpol.2009.05.010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
69db0890-354c-4358-b11b-795f2156cf7a (old id 1469601)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19692141?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-09-04 14:56:25
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:40:23
@article{69db0890-354c-4358-b11b-795f2156cf7a,
  abstract     = {AIMS: Associations between marital status and self-rated health were investigated, adjusting for material conditions and trust (social capital). METHODS: The 2004 public-health survey in Skåne is a cross-sectional study. A total of 27,757 persons aged 18-80 years answered a postal questionnaire, which represents 59% of the random sample. A logistic regression model was used to investigate associations between marital status and self-rated health, adjusting for economic problems and trust. RESULTS: The prevalence of poor self-rated health was 28.7% among men and 33.2% among women. Older respondents, respondents born abroad, with medium/low education, low emotional support, low instrumental support, economic problems, low trust, never married and divorced had significantly higher odds ratios of poor self-rated health than their respective reference group. Low trust was significantly higher among the divorced and unmarried compared to the married/cohabitating. Adjustment for economic problems but not for trust reduced the odds ratios of poor self-rated health among the divorced, which became not significant among men. CONCLUSIONS: Never married and the divorced have significantly higher age-adjusted odds ratios of poor self-rated health than the married/cohabitating group. Economic problems but not trust seem to affect the association between marital status and poor self-rated health.},
  author       = {Lindström, Martin},
  issn         = {1872-6054},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {172--179},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Health Policy},
  title        = {Marital status, social capital, material conditions and self-rated health: A population-based study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthpol.2009.05.010},
  volume       = {93},
  year         = {2009},
}