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Chlorosis in wild plants: Is it a sign of iron deficiency?

Zohlen, Angelika LU (2002) In Journal of Plant Nutrition 25(10). p.2205-2228
Abstract
Chlorosis in crops grown on calcareous soil is mainly due to iron (Fe) deficiency and can be alleviated by leaf application of soluble Fe2+ or diluted acids. Whether chlorosis in indigenous plants forced to grow on a calcareous soil is also caused by Fe deficiency has, however, not been demonstrated. Veronica officinalis, a widespread calcifuge plant in Central and Northern Europe, was cultivated in two experiments on acid and calcareous soils. As phosphorus (P) deficiency is one of the major causes of the inability of many calcifuges to grow on calcareous soil we added phosphate to half of the soils. Leaves in pots with the unfertilized and the P-fertilized soil, respectively, were either sprayed with FeSO4 solution or left unsprayed.... (More)
Chlorosis in crops grown on calcareous soil is mainly due to iron (Fe) deficiency and can be alleviated by leaf application of soluble Fe2+ or diluted acids. Whether chlorosis in indigenous plants forced to grow on a calcareous soil is also caused by Fe deficiency has, however, not been demonstrated. Veronica officinalis, a widespread calcifuge plant in Central and Northern Europe, was cultivated in two experiments on acid and calcareous soils. As phosphorus (P) deficiency is one of the major causes of the inability of many calcifuges to grow on calcareous soil we added phosphate to half of the soils. Leaves in pots with the unfertilized and the P-fertilized soil, respectively, were either sprayed with FeSO4 solution or left unsprayed. Total Fe, P, and manganese (Mn) in leaves and roots and N remaining in the soil after the experiment were determined. In a second experiment, no P was added. Leaves were either sprayed with FeSO4 or with H2SO4 of the same pH as the FeSO4 solution. Degree of chlorosis and Fe content in leaves were determined. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Plant Nutrition
volume
25
issue
10
pages
2205 - 2228
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000178101900010
  • scopus:0036383613
ISSN
0190-4167
DOI
10.1081/PLN-120014071
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
95418adf-65d3-4b3a-83bd-61c64ec00ad3 (old id 147168)
date added to LUP
2007-07-03 10:43:03
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:30:19
@article{95418adf-65d3-4b3a-83bd-61c64ec00ad3,
  abstract     = {Chlorosis in crops grown on calcareous soil is mainly due to iron (Fe) deficiency and can be alleviated by leaf application of soluble Fe2+ or diluted acids. Whether chlorosis in indigenous plants forced to grow on a calcareous soil is also caused by Fe deficiency has, however, not been demonstrated. Veronica officinalis, a widespread calcifuge plant in Central and Northern Europe, was cultivated in two experiments on acid and calcareous soils. As phosphorus (P) deficiency is one of the major causes of the inability of many calcifuges to grow on calcareous soil we added phosphate to half of the soils. Leaves in pots with the unfertilized and the P-fertilized soil, respectively, were either sprayed with FeSO4 solution or left unsprayed. Total Fe, P, and manganese (Mn) in leaves and roots and N remaining in the soil after the experiment were determined. In a second experiment, no P was added. Leaves were either sprayed with FeSO4 or with H2SO4 of the same pH as the FeSO4 solution. Degree of chlorosis and Fe content in leaves were determined.},
  author       = {Zohlen, Angelika},
  issn         = {0190-4167},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {2205--2228},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Journal of Plant Nutrition},
  title        = {Chlorosis in wild plants: Is it a sign of iron deficiency?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1081/PLN-120014071},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2002},
}