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Prediction of species response to atmospheric nitrogen deposition by means of ecological measures and life history traits

Diekmann, M and Falkengren-Grerup, Ursula LU (2002) In Journal of Ecology 90(1). p.108-120
Abstract
1 The main objective of this study was to predict the responses of vascular plant species to atmospheric nitrogen deposition and enhanced soil nitrogen levels. The study was carried out in deciduous forests located in three regions of southern Sweden. The abundance of vascular plants, as well as soil pH and nitrogen mineralization rates, were studied in a total of 661 sample plots. 2 We calculated an ecological measure (N-dev value) for all species based on their observed vs. expected nitrification ratios at a given soil pH, and compared its accuracy in predicting abundance changes with results using life history traits. Data from long-term field studies and fertilization experiments were used for validation. 3 N-dev values were positively... (More)
1 The main objective of this study was to predict the responses of vascular plant species to atmospheric nitrogen deposition and enhanced soil nitrogen levels. The study was carried out in deciduous forests located in three regions of southern Sweden. The abundance of vascular plants, as well as soil pH and nitrogen mineralization rates, were studied in a total of 661 sample plots. 2 We calculated an ecological measure (N-dev value) for all species based on their observed vs. expected nitrification ratios at a given soil pH, and compared its accuracy in predicting abundance changes with results using life history traits. Data from long-term field studies and fertilization experiments were used for validation. 3 N-dev values were positively correlated between neighbouring regions. Values for the southernmost region (Skane) were also positively related to the changes in species frequency observed in large-scale flora surveys and permanent plot studies in that area and with species changes reported from Central Europe. Values from one of two other regions were also consistent. N-dev values from Skane (but no other region) predicted species responses in short-term fertilization experiments. 4 No life history trait was as good a predictor as N-dev, although plant height, leaf anatomy, leaf nitrogen concentration and phenology showed significant correlations. Attributes related to taxonomy, life form, relative growth rate and habitat type showed no agreement with the changes in species abundance. 5 We predict that species with the following attribute syndrome will increase in abundance in response to enhanced nitrogen levels: those favoured by a high soil nitrification ratio relative to other species at a given soil pH, tall stature, hydro- to helomorph anatomy, high leaf nitrogen concentration and a late phenological development. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Ecology
volume
90
issue
1
pages
108 - 120
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000174154500011
  • scopus:0036188580
ISSN
1365-2745
DOI
10.1046/j.0022-0477.2001.00639.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
60cbcbcd-5441-485e-99cd-b0c3e455d122 (old id 147209)
date added to LUP
2007-07-02 09:19:42
date last changed
2017-09-17 05:26:43
@article{60cbcbcd-5441-485e-99cd-b0c3e455d122,
  abstract     = {1 The main objective of this study was to predict the responses of vascular plant species to atmospheric nitrogen deposition and enhanced soil nitrogen levels. The study was carried out in deciduous forests located in three regions of southern Sweden. The abundance of vascular plants, as well as soil pH and nitrogen mineralization rates, were studied in a total of 661 sample plots. 2 We calculated an ecological measure (N-dev value) for all species based on their observed vs. expected nitrification ratios at a given soil pH, and compared its accuracy in predicting abundance changes with results using life history traits. Data from long-term field studies and fertilization experiments were used for validation. 3 N-dev values were positively correlated between neighbouring regions. Values for the southernmost region (Skane) were also positively related to the changes in species frequency observed in large-scale flora surveys and permanent plot studies in that area and with species changes reported from Central Europe. Values from one of two other regions were also consistent. N-dev values from Skane (but no other region) predicted species responses in short-term fertilization experiments. 4 No life history trait was as good a predictor as N-dev, although plant height, leaf anatomy, leaf nitrogen concentration and phenology showed significant correlations. Attributes related to taxonomy, life form, relative growth rate and habitat type showed no agreement with the changes in species abundance. 5 We predict that species with the following attribute syndrome will increase in abundance in response to enhanced nitrogen levels: those favoured by a high soil nitrification ratio relative to other species at a given soil pH, tall stature, hydro- to helomorph anatomy, high leaf nitrogen concentration and a late phenological development.},
  author       = {Diekmann, M and Falkengren-Grerup, Ursula},
  issn         = {1365-2745},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {108--120},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Ecology},
  title        = {Prediction of species response to atmospheric nitrogen deposition by means of ecological measures and life history traits},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.0022-0477.2001.00639.x},
  volume       = {90},
  year         = {2002},
}