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Long-term anhydrobiotic survival in semi-terrestrial micrometazoans

Guidetti, R and Jönsson, Ingemar LU (2002) In Journal of Zoology 257(2). p.181-187
Abstract
This study represents the first systematic investigation of long-term anhydrobiotic survival in tardigrades, rotifers and nematodes inhabiting mosses and lichens. Sixty-three different samples from public and private collections, kept dry for 9-138 years, were examined. Rotifers of the genus Mniohia and the eutardigrade Ramazzottius oberhaeuseri (hatched from eggs) were found alive from one of the samples (9 years old). These observations represent the longest record for rotifers in the anhydrobiotic state. For tardigrades, our results confirm previous reports on the upper limit of anhydrobiotic survival under atmospheric oxygen conditions. This study suggests the possibility that tardigrade eggs are able to withstand longer periods in... (More)
This study represents the first systematic investigation of long-term anhydrobiotic survival in tardigrades, rotifers and nematodes inhabiting mosses and lichens. Sixty-three different samples from public and private collections, kept dry for 9-138 years, were examined. Rotifers of the genus Mniohia and the eutardigrade Ramazzottius oberhaeuseri (hatched from eggs) were found alive from one of the samples (9 years old). These observations represent the longest record for rotifers in the anhydrobiotic state. For tardigrades, our results confirm previous reports on the upper limit of anhydrobiotic survival under atmospheric oxygen conditions. This study suggests the possibility that tardigrade eggs are able to withstand longer periods in anhydrobiosis than animals. Some problems related to the evaluation of long-term anhydrobiotic survival, such as contamination and chemical treatments of samples, are reported. The possible role of the microenvironment in which the anhydrobiotic animals are kept is discussed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Zoology
volume
257
issue
2
pages
181 - 187
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000176498400006
  • scopus:0036282091
ISSN
0952-8369
DOI
10.1017/S095283690200078X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
946d4f33-dbe1-4ccd-9cf8-2629ce76a955 (old id 147480)
date added to LUP
2007-07-03 11:24:36
date last changed
2017-12-10 03:45:41
@article{946d4f33-dbe1-4ccd-9cf8-2629ce76a955,
  abstract     = {This study represents the first systematic investigation of long-term anhydrobiotic survival in tardigrades, rotifers and nematodes inhabiting mosses and lichens. Sixty-three different samples from public and private collections, kept dry for 9-138 years, were examined. Rotifers of the genus Mniohia and the eutardigrade Ramazzottius oberhaeuseri (hatched from eggs) were found alive from one of the samples (9 years old). These observations represent the longest record for rotifers in the anhydrobiotic state. For tardigrades, our results confirm previous reports on the upper limit of anhydrobiotic survival under atmospheric oxygen conditions. This study suggests the possibility that tardigrade eggs are able to withstand longer periods in anhydrobiosis than animals. Some problems related to the evaluation of long-term anhydrobiotic survival, such as contamination and chemical treatments of samples, are reported. The possible role of the microenvironment in which the anhydrobiotic animals are kept is discussed.},
  author       = {Guidetti, R and Jönsson, Ingemar},
  issn         = {0952-8369},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {181--187},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Zoology},
  title        = {Long-term anhydrobiotic survival in semi-terrestrial micrometazoans},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S095283690200078X},
  volume       = {257},
  year         = {2002},
}