Advanced

Effects of methyl bromide fumigation on anhydrobiotic micrometazoans

Jönsson, Ingemar LU and Guidetti, R (2001) In Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety 50(1). p.72-75
Abstract
Anhydrobiotic organisms are well known for their resistance to extreme environmental conditions while in the inactive, ametabolic, state. This study confirms that this resistance also transfers to treatments with the fumigant methyl bromide. Live specimens of nematodes, rotifers, and tardigrades were found after 70 h of treatment with methyl bromide. Quantitative estimates of survival in the eutardigrade Richtersitts coronifer revealed no difference between treated and untreated samples which had been kept dry for a short time. However, R. coronifer from samples collected 11 months before treatment had lower survival compared to samples collected shortly before the treatment. The fact that anhydrobiotic organisms escape treatments with... (More)
Anhydrobiotic organisms are well known for their resistance to extreme environmental conditions while in the inactive, ametabolic, state. This study confirms that this resistance also transfers to treatments with the fumigant methyl bromide. Live specimens of nematodes, rotifers, and tardigrades were found after 70 h of treatment with methyl bromide. Quantitative estimates of survival in the eutardigrade Richtersitts coronifer revealed no difference between treated and untreated samples which had been kept dry for a short time. However, R. coronifer from samples collected 11 months before treatment had lower survival compared to samples collected shortly before the treatment. The fact that anhydrobiotic organisms escape treatments with biocides should be considered a serious problem, both for the food industry and from the perspective of human-mediated spread of organisms. (C) 2001 Academic Press. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety
volume
50
issue
1
pages
72 - 75
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:0034854699
ISSN
0147-6513
DOI
10.1006/eesa.2001.2090
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d6ae4276-d260-471f-bc2e-e4aa2147ca0a (old id 147523)
date added to LUP
2007-07-03 13:12:44
date last changed
2018-05-29 12:19:54
@article{d6ae4276-d260-471f-bc2e-e4aa2147ca0a,
  abstract     = {Anhydrobiotic organisms are well known for their resistance to extreme environmental conditions while in the inactive, ametabolic, state. This study confirms that this resistance also transfers to treatments with the fumigant methyl bromide. Live specimens of nematodes, rotifers, and tardigrades were found after 70 h of treatment with methyl bromide. Quantitative estimates of survival in the eutardigrade Richtersitts coronifer revealed no difference between treated and untreated samples which had been kept dry for a short time. However, R. coronifer from samples collected 11 months before treatment had lower survival compared to samples collected shortly before the treatment. The fact that anhydrobiotic organisms escape treatments with biocides should be considered a serious problem, both for the food industry and from the perspective of human-mediated spread of organisms. (C) 2001 Academic Press.},
  author       = {Jönsson, Ingemar and Guidetti, R},
  issn         = {0147-6513},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {72--75},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety},
  title        = {Effects of methyl bromide fumigation on anhydrobiotic micrometazoans},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/eesa.2001.2090},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2001},
}