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Does the Current Constraints in Funding Promote Failure in Humanitarian Supply Chains?

Jahre, Marianne LU and Heigh, Ian (2008) In Supply Chain Forum: An International Journal 9(2). p.44-45
Abstract
Traditionally, most funding is made available when a disaster occurs. Disaster re-sponse is the implementation of what humanitarian actors did (or didn't do) in pre-paredness for any intervention. Based on a case study of a logistics change in the International Federation of Red Cross Red Crescent Society, this paper discusses how more funding of preparedness can radically improve the speed and quality of response. Findings contribute to our understanding of how changes in funding can improve logistics performance and support faster recovery due to increased pre-paredness in disaster-prone areas. Illustrating how postponement/speculation logis-tics strategies are applied to flows of material, information, and human resources, it is... (More)
Traditionally, most funding is made available when a disaster occurs. Disaster re-sponse is the implementation of what humanitarian actors did (or didn't do) in pre-paredness for any intervention. Based on a case study of a logistics change in the International Federation of Red Cross Red Crescent Society, this paper discusses how more funding of preparedness can radically improve the speed and quality of response. Findings contribute to our understanding of how changes in funding can improve logistics performance and support faster recovery due to increased pre-paredness in disaster-prone areas. Illustrating how postponement/speculation logis-tics strategies are applied to flows of material, information, and human resources, it is concluded that associated changes of financial flows are required. Donors and NGOs must think of more ?speculative?, long-term, and unearmarked funding with particular attention to risk sharing, cost recovery, and measurements. This paper contributes to further understanding of postponement/speculation in project-based settings (temporary supply networks), how funding and logistics (payment and materials flows) are related, as well as the present funding models? implications for ef-ficiency and effectiveness in humanitarian aid. These are all areas that have been underresearched. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Humanitarain supply chain funding logistics preparedness Red Cross material flows desaster recovery
in
Supply Chain Forum: An International Journal
volume
9
issue
2
pages
44 - 45
publisher
Bordeaux Ecole de Management
ISSN
1624-6039
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f02331ef-861c-4f2b-a352-52ff053be2f1 (old id 1479810)
alternative location
http://www.supplychain-forum.com/article.cfm?num=17&art=150&CFID=9740743&CFTOKEN=37544785
date added to LUP
2009-09-29 09:27:30
date last changed
2016-04-16 06:02:20
@article{f02331ef-861c-4f2b-a352-52ff053be2f1,
  abstract     = {Traditionally, most funding is made available when a disaster occurs. Disaster re-sponse is the implementation of what humanitarian actors did (or didn't do) in pre-paredness for any intervention. Based on a case study of a logistics change in the International Federation of Red Cross Red Crescent Society, this paper discusses how more funding of preparedness can radically improve the speed and quality of response. Findings contribute to our understanding of how changes in funding can improve logistics performance and support faster recovery due to increased pre-paredness in disaster-prone areas. Illustrating how postponement/speculation logis-tics strategies are applied to flows of material, information, and human resources, it is concluded that associated changes of financial flows are required. Donors and NGOs must think of more ?speculative?, long-term, and unearmarked funding with particular attention to risk sharing, cost recovery, and measurements. This paper contributes to further understanding of postponement/speculation in project-based settings (temporary supply networks), how funding and logistics (payment and materials flows) are related, as well as the present funding models? implications for ef-ficiency and effectiveness in humanitarian aid. These are all areas that have been underresearched.},
  author       = {Jahre, Marianne and Heigh, Ian},
  issn         = {1624-6039},
  keyword      = {Humanitarain supply chain funding logistics preparedness Red Cross material flows desaster recovery},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {44--45},
  publisher    = {Bordeaux Ecole de Management},
  series       = {Supply Chain Forum: An International Journal},
  title        = {Does the Current Constraints in Funding Promote Failure in Humanitarian Supply Chains?},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2008},
}