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Gender affects self-evaluation in children with cystic fibrosis and their healthy siblings.

Wennstrom, Inga-Lill; Bergman, Ulla; Kornfält, Ragnhild LU and Rydén, Olof LU (2005) In Acta Pædiatrica 94(9). p.1320-1326
Abstract
Aim: To determine whether self-esteem among children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and their healthy siblings differs from that of a healthy reference group and whether there are differences within and between sibling pairs. Methods: All Swedish CF children 6–14 y old with a healthy sibling in the same age range (n=65) were invited to participate, 55 sibling pairs and their parents taking part in the study. Five aspects of the children's self-concept—physical characteristics, skills and talents, mental well-being, relations to parents and family, and relations to others—were assessed by the "I think I am" self-evaluation questionnaire. Severity of illness was assessed by means of the Shwachman Clinical Evaluation System. Results: Whereas... (More)
Aim: To determine whether self-esteem among children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and their healthy siblings differs from that of a healthy reference group and whether there are differences within and between sibling pairs. Methods: All Swedish CF children 6–14 y old with a healthy sibling in the same age range (n=65) were invited to participate, 55 sibling pairs and their parents taking part in the study. Five aspects of the children's self-concept—physical characteristics, skills and talents, mental well-being, relations to parents and family, and relations to others—were assessed by the "I think I am" self-evaluation questionnaire. Severity of illness was assessed by means of the Shwachman Clinical Evaluation System. Results: Whereas self-evaluation did not differ between groups at a general level, healthy girls as well as those with CF scored lower than girls in the reference group on the "mental well-being" and "relations to parents and family" subscales. Comparison of gender combinations (sick girl/healthy boy, sick girl/healthy girl, sick boy/healthy boy, sick boy/healthy girl) suggested that girls pay a cost of a lesser sense of psychological well-being and feelings of inadequacy in relation to their parents and family. The Shwachman score of the sick child was not related to the level of self-esteem.



Conclusion: When CF is present among siblings, girls seem to carry more of the family pain than boys, a finding that calls for an increased awareness of the girls' situation by members of care teams. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Pædiatrica
volume
94
issue
9
pages
1320 - 1326
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000232882200026
  • pmid:16278999
  • scopus:27144517670
ISSN
1651-2227
DOI
10.1111/j.1651-2227.2005.tb02094.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e99cf042-2948-4891-8131-af379ece2f5e (old id 148023)
date added to LUP
2007-06-26 08:12:47
date last changed
2017-08-20 04:15:31
@article{e99cf042-2948-4891-8131-af379ece2f5e,
  abstract     = {Aim: To determine whether self-esteem among children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and their healthy siblings differs from that of a healthy reference group and whether there are differences within and between sibling pairs. Methods: All Swedish CF children 6–14 y old with a healthy sibling in the same age range (n=65) were invited to participate, 55 sibling pairs and their parents taking part in the study. Five aspects of the children's self-concept—physical characteristics, skills and talents, mental well-being, relations to parents and family, and relations to others—were assessed by the "I think I am" self-evaluation questionnaire. Severity of illness was assessed by means of the Shwachman Clinical Evaluation System. Results: Whereas self-evaluation did not differ between groups at a general level, healthy girls as well as those with CF scored lower than girls in the reference group on the "mental well-being" and "relations to parents and family" subscales. Comparison of gender combinations (sick girl/healthy boy, sick girl/healthy girl, sick boy/healthy boy, sick boy/healthy girl) suggested that girls pay a cost of a lesser sense of psychological well-being and feelings of inadequacy in relation to their parents and family. The Shwachman score of the sick child was not related to the level of self-esteem.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusion: When CF is present among siblings, girls seem to carry more of the family pain than boys, a finding that calls for an increased awareness of the girls' situation by members of care teams.},
  author       = {Wennstrom, Inga-Lill and Bergman, Ulla and Kornfält, Ragnhild and Rydén, Olof},
  issn         = {1651-2227},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1320--1326},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Acta Pædiatrica},
  title        = {Gender affects self-evaluation in children with cystic fibrosis and their healthy siblings.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2005.tb02094.x},
  volume       = {94},
  year         = {2005},
}