Advanced

Physiological determinants of the variation in left ventricular mass from early adolescence to late adulthood in healthy subjects.

Cain, Peter LU ; Ahl, Ragnhild; Hedström, Erik LU ; Ugander, Martin LU ; Allansdotter-Johnsson, Ase; Friberg, Peter; Marild, Staffan and Arheden, Håkan LU (2005) In Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging 25(6). p.332-339
Abstract
Background: The physiological determinants of left ventricular mass (LVM) measured by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging are not well defined as prior investigators have studied either adults or adolescents in isolation or have not strictly excluded hypertension or accounted for the effects of exercise habits, haemodynamic, demographic, or body shape characteristics.



Methods: A total of 102 healthy volunteers (12–81 years, 53 males) underwent CMR. All parameters [unstandardized and adjusted for body surface area (BSA)] were analysed according to gender and by adolescence versus adulthood (adolescents <20 years, adults ≥20 years). The influence of haemodynamic factors, exercise, and demographic factors on LVM... (More)
Background: The physiological determinants of left ventricular mass (LVM) measured by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging are not well defined as prior investigators have studied either adults or adolescents in isolation or have not strictly excluded hypertension or accounted for the effects of exercise habits, haemodynamic, demographic, or body shape characteristics.



Methods: A total of 102 healthy volunteers (12–81 years, 53 males) underwent CMR. All parameters [unstandardized and adjusted for body surface area (BSA)] were analysed according to gender and by adolescence versus adulthood (adolescents <20 years, adults ≥20 years). The influence of haemodynamic factors, exercise, and demographic factors on LVM were determined with multivariate linear regression.



Results: LVM rose during adolescence and declined in adulthood. LVM and LVMBSA were higher in males both in adults (LVM: 188 ± 22 g versus 139 ± 21 g, P<0·001; LVMBSA: 94 ± 11 g m−2 versus 80 ± 11 g m−2, P<0·001) and in adolescents when adjusted for BSA (LVM: 128 ± 29 g versus 107 ± 20 g, P = 0·063; LVMBSA: 82 ± 8 g m−2 versus 71 ± 10 g m−2, P = 0·025). In adults, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and self-reported physical activity increased while meridional and circumferential wall stress were constant with age. Multivariate regression analysis revealed age, gender, and BSA as the major determinants of LVM (global R2 = 0·69).



Conclusions: Normal LVM shows variation over a broad age range in both genders with a rise in adolescence and subsequent decline with increasing age in adulthood despite an increase in SBP and physical activity. BSA, age, and gender were found to be major contributors to the variation in LVM in healthy adults, while haemodynamic factors, exercise, and wall stress were not. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
ageing, magnetic resonance, myocardium, physiology, ventricles (heart)
in
Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
volume
25
issue
6
pages
332 - 339
publisher
Wiley Online Library
external identifiers
  • wos:000232849800004
  • pmid:16268984
  • scopus:28244454592
ISSN
1475-0961
DOI
10.1111/j.1475-097X.2005.00632.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0ce99a49-d058-47af-9c3a-c1e3e5c02e3d (old id 148174)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=16268984&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-20 16:28:17
date last changed
2017-08-13 03:33:45
@article{0ce99a49-d058-47af-9c3a-c1e3e5c02e3d,
  abstract     = {Background: The physiological determinants of left ventricular mass (LVM) measured by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging are not well defined as prior investigators have studied either adults or adolescents in isolation or have not strictly excluded hypertension or accounted for the effects of exercise habits, haemodynamic, demographic, or body shape characteristics.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods: A total of 102 healthy volunteers (12–81 years, 53 males) underwent CMR. All parameters [unstandardized and adjusted for body surface area (BSA)] were analysed according to gender and by adolescence versus adulthood (adolescents &lt;20 years, adults ≥20 years). The influence of haemodynamic factors, exercise, and demographic factors on LVM were determined with multivariate linear regression.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results: LVM rose during adolescence and declined in adulthood. LVM and LVMBSA were higher in males both in adults (LVM: 188 ± 22 g versus 139 ± 21 g, P&lt;0·001; LVMBSA: 94 ± 11 g m−2 versus 80 ± 11 g m−2, P&lt;0·001) and in adolescents when adjusted for BSA (LVM: 128 ± 29 g versus 107 ± 20 g, P = 0·063; LVMBSA: 82 ± 8 g m−2 versus 71 ± 10 g m−2, P = 0·025). In adults, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and self-reported physical activity increased while meridional and circumferential wall stress were constant with age. Multivariate regression analysis revealed age, gender, and BSA as the major determinants of LVM (global R2 = 0·69).<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions: Normal LVM shows variation over a broad age range in both genders with a rise in adolescence and subsequent decline with increasing age in adulthood despite an increase in SBP and physical activity. BSA, age, and gender were found to be major contributors to the variation in LVM in healthy adults, while haemodynamic factors, exercise, and wall stress were not.},
  author       = {Cain, Peter and Ahl, Ragnhild and Hedström, Erik and Ugander, Martin and Allansdotter-Johnsson, Ase and Friberg, Peter and Marild, Staffan and Arheden, Håkan},
  issn         = {1475-0961},
  keyword      = {ageing,magnetic resonance,myocardium,physiology,ventricles (heart)},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {332--339},
  publisher    = {Wiley Online Library},
  series       = {Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging},
  title        = {Physiological determinants of the variation in left ventricular mass from early adolescence to late adulthood in healthy subjects.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-097X.2005.00632.x},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2005},
}