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Intersexual differences in European lobster (Homarus gammarus): recognition mechanisms and agonistic behaviours

Skog, Malin LU (2009) In Behaviour 146. p.1071-1091
Abstract
Dominance can be maintained through status recognition or recognition of individual (familiar) opponents. In crustaceans, both types of recognition exist, often based on chemical signals. Fight behaviours involved in establishment and maintenance of dominance relationships in male and female European lobster (Homarus gammarus) were examined. Same-sex pairs of size-matched animals interacted on two consecutive days, encountering either the same (familiar) or another (unfamiliar) opponent of the opposite dominance status in the second fight. Results show that both female and male H. gammarus establish dominance in a first encounter, and maintain dominance in a second interaction against a familiar animal, resulting in decreased fight... (More)
Dominance can be maintained through status recognition or recognition of individual (familiar) opponents. In crustaceans, both types of recognition exist, often based on chemical signals. Fight behaviours involved in establishment and maintenance of dominance relationships in male and female European lobster (Homarus gammarus) were examined. Same-sex pairs of size-matched animals interacted on two consecutive days, encountering either the same (familiar) or another (unfamiliar) opponent of the opposite dominance status in the second fight. Results show that both female and male H. gammarus establish dominance in a first encounter, and maintain dominance in a second interaction against a familiar animal, resulting in decreased fight duration and lower aggression levels. Female losers that met an unfamiliar dominant also had short second days with low aggression, while male losers responded to unfamiliar animals with high aggression and long fights. Thus, males distinguish between familiar and unfamiliar opponents, indicating individual recognition whereas females do not, indicating that they use dominance status recognition rather than individual recognition. Female-female fights involved more high-level aggression (claw lock) than male-male fights, contrary to the belief that male lobsters are more aggressive than females. H. gammarus fights also escalated to unrestrained violence fast, indicating low levels of ritualisation. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
recognition, sex difference, female aggression, aggressive behaviour, dominance hierarchy
in
Behaviour
volume
146
pages
1071 - 1091
publisher
Brill Academic Publishers
external identifiers
  • wos:000270189400004
  • scopus:70149118345
ISSN
1568-539X
DOI
10.1163/156853909X406437
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a6de2d18-1b03-48b9-8f6a-be67241dd32b (old id 1490150)
date added to LUP
2009-10-19 15:46:37
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:27:21
@article{a6de2d18-1b03-48b9-8f6a-be67241dd32b,
  abstract     = {Dominance can be maintained through status recognition or recognition of individual (familiar) opponents. In crustaceans, both types of recognition exist, often based on chemical signals. Fight behaviours involved in establishment and maintenance of dominance relationships in male and female European lobster (Homarus gammarus) were examined. Same-sex pairs of size-matched animals interacted on two consecutive days, encountering either the same (familiar) or another (unfamiliar) opponent of the opposite dominance status in the second fight. Results show that both female and male H. gammarus establish dominance in a first encounter, and maintain dominance in a second interaction against a familiar animal, resulting in decreased fight duration and lower aggression levels. Female losers that met an unfamiliar dominant also had short second days with low aggression, while male losers responded to unfamiliar animals with high aggression and long fights. Thus, males distinguish between familiar and unfamiliar opponents, indicating individual recognition whereas females do not, indicating that they use dominance status recognition rather than individual recognition. Female-female fights involved more high-level aggression (claw lock) than male-male fights, contrary to the belief that male lobsters are more aggressive than females. H. gammarus fights also escalated to unrestrained violence fast, indicating low levels of ritualisation.},
  author       = {Skog, Malin},
  issn         = {1568-539X},
  keyword      = {recognition,sex difference,female aggression,aggressive behaviour,dominance hierarchy},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1071--1091},
  publisher    = {Brill Academic Publishers},
  series       = {Behaviour},
  title        = {Intersexual differences in European lobster (Homarus gammarus): recognition mechanisms and agonistic behaviours},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/156853909X406437},
  volume       = {146},
  year         = {2009},
}