Advanced

Phosphatase activity of extra-radical arbuscular mycorrhizal hyphae: A review.

Joner, E J; van Aarle, Ingrid LU and Vosatka, M (2000) In Plant and Soil 226(2). p.199-210
Abstract
Phosphatase activity of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi has attracted attention in three fairly distinct domains: intracellular enzymes with defined metabolic functions that have been studied in intraradical hyphae, histochemical staining of alkaline phosphatase as an indicator of fungal activity measured both intra- and extraradically, and extracellular activity related to mineralization of organic P (Po) compounds that may enhance mycorrhizal utilization of an important nutrient pool in soil. This review focuses on the latter subjects with emphasis on extraradical mycelium (ERM), while it draws on selected data from the vast material available concerning phosphatases of other organisms. We conclude that histochemical staining of... (More)
Phosphatase activity of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi has attracted attention in three fairly distinct domains: intracellular enzymes with defined metabolic functions that have been studied in intraradical hyphae, histochemical staining of alkaline phosphatase as an indicator of fungal activity measured both intra- and extraradically, and extracellular activity related to mineralization of organic P (Po) compounds that may enhance mycorrhizal utilization of an important nutrient pool in soil. This review focuses on the latter subjects with emphasis on extraradical mycelium (ERM), while it draws on selected data from the vast material available concerning phosphatases of other organisms. We conclude that histochemical staining of alkaline phosphatase is a sensitive and suitable method for monitoring the effect of adverse conditions encountered by ERM both as a symbiotically functional entity in soil, and in vitro without modifying interference of soil or other solid substrates. Furthermore, the quantitative importance of extracellular enzymes for P nutrition of AM plants is estimated to be insignificant. This is concluded from the low quantitative contribution extracellular hyphae of AM fungi give to the total phosphatase activity in soil, and from estimations of which processes that may be rate limiting in organic P mineralization. Maximum values for the former is in the order of a few percent. As for the latter, solubilization of Po seems to be far more important than Po hydrolysis for utilization of Po by AM fungi and plants, as both endogenous soil phosphatase activity and phosphatases of other soil organisms are ubiquitous and abundant. Our discussion of mycorrhizal phosphatases supports the view that extracellular phosphatases of roots and micro-organisms are to a large extent released incidentally into soil, and that the source has limited benefit from its activity. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Plant and Soil
volume
226
issue
2
pages
199 - 210
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:0034494690
ISSN
0032-079X
DOI
10.1023/A:1026582207192
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1f6b6109-e4f5-40c1-8836-66860bec7e54 (old id 149455)
date added to LUP
2007-06-29 11:15:08
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:37:18
@article{1f6b6109-e4f5-40c1-8836-66860bec7e54,
  abstract     = {Phosphatase activity of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi has attracted attention in three fairly distinct domains: intracellular enzymes with defined metabolic functions that have been studied in intraradical hyphae, histochemical staining of alkaline phosphatase as an indicator of fungal activity measured both intra- and extraradically, and extracellular activity related to mineralization of organic P (Po) compounds that may enhance mycorrhizal utilization of an important nutrient pool in soil. This review focuses on the latter subjects with emphasis on extraradical mycelium (ERM), while it draws on selected data from the vast material available concerning phosphatases of other organisms. We conclude that histochemical staining of alkaline phosphatase is a sensitive and suitable method for monitoring the effect of adverse conditions encountered by ERM both as a symbiotically functional entity in soil, and in vitro without modifying interference of soil or other solid substrates. Furthermore, the quantitative importance of extracellular enzymes for P nutrition of AM plants is estimated to be insignificant. This is concluded from the low quantitative contribution extracellular hyphae of AM fungi give to the total phosphatase activity in soil, and from estimations of which processes that may be rate limiting in organic P mineralization. Maximum values for the former is in the order of a few percent. As for the latter, solubilization of Po seems to be far more important than Po hydrolysis for utilization of Po by AM fungi and plants, as both endogenous soil phosphatase activity and phosphatases of other soil organisms are ubiquitous and abundant. Our discussion of mycorrhizal phosphatases supports the view that extracellular phosphatases of roots and micro-organisms are to a large extent released incidentally into soil, and that the source has limited benefit from its activity.},
  author       = {Joner, E J and van Aarle, Ingrid and Vosatka, M},
  issn         = {0032-079X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {199--210},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Plant and Soil},
  title        = {Phosphatase activity of extra-radical arbuscular mycorrhizal hyphae: A review.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1026582207192},
  volume       = {226},
  year         = {2000},
}