Advanced

Management of Inadvertent Arterial Catheterisation Associated with Central Venous Access Procedures.

Pikwer, Andreas LU ; Acosta, Stefan LU ; Kölbel, Tilo LU ; Malina, Martin LU ; Sonesson, Björn LU and Åkeson, Jonas LU (2009) In European journal of vascular and endovascular surgery 38. p.707-714
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe the clinical management of inadvertent arterial catheterisation after attempted central venous catheterisation. METHODS: Patients referred for surgical or endovascular management for inadvertent arterial catheterisation during a 5-year period were identified from an endovascular database, providing prospective information on techniques and outcome. The corresponding patient records and radiographic reports were analysed retrospectively. RESULTS: Eleven inadvertent arterial (four common carotid, six subclavian and one femoral) catheterisations had been carried out in 10 patients. Risk factors were obesity (n=2), short neck (n=1) and emergency procedure (n=4). All central venous access procedures but... (More)
OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe the clinical management of inadvertent arterial catheterisation after attempted central venous catheterisation. METHODS: Patients referred for surgical or endovascular management for inadvertent arterial catheterisation during a 5-year period were identified from an endovascular database, providing prospective information on techniques and outcome. The corresponding patient records and radiographic reports were analysed retrospectively. RESULTS: Eleven inadvertent arterial (four common carotid, six subclavian and one femoral) catheterisations had been carried out in 10 patients. Risk factors were obesity (n=2), short neck (n=1) and emergency procedure (n=4). All central venous access procedures but one had been made using external landmark techniques. The techniques used were stent-graft placement (n=6), percutaneous suture device (n=2), external compression after angiography (n=1), balloon occlusion and open repair (n=1) and open repair after failure of percutaneous suture device (n=1). There were no procedure-related complications within a median follow-up period of 16 months. CONCLUSIONS: Inadvertent arterial catheterisation during central venous cannulation is associated with obesity, emergency puncture and lack of ultrasonic guidance and should be suspected on retrograde/pulsatile catheter flow or local haematoma. If arterial catheterisation is recognised, the catheter should be left in place and the patient be referred for percutaneous/endovascular or surgical management. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European journal of vascular and endovascular surgery
volume
38
pages
707 - 714
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • WOS:000273143400007
  • PMID:19800822
  • Scopus:71649105601
ISSN
1532-2165
DOI
10.1016/j.ejvs.2009.08.009
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7449f034-d840-4504-9a72-a485853b0263 (old id 1500719)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19800822?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-11-04 12:38:14
date last changed
2017-01-08 05:29:54
@article{7449f034-d840-4504-9a72-a485853b0263,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe the clinical management of inadvertent arterial catheterisation after attempted central venous catheterisation. METHODS: Patients referred for surgical or endovascular management for inadvertent arterial catheterisation during a 5-year period were identified from an endovascular database, providing prospective information on techniques and outcome. The corresponding patient records and radiographic reports were analysed retrospectively. RESULTS: Eleven inadvertent arterial (four common carotid, six subclavian and one femoral) catheterisations had been carried out in 10 patients. Risk factors were obesity (n=2), short neck (n=1) and emergency procedure (n=4). All central venous access procedures but one had been made using external landmark techniques. The techniques used were stent-graft placement (n=6), percutaneous suture device (n=2), external compression after angiography (n=1), balloon occlusion and open repair (n=1) and open repair after failure of percutaneous suture device (n=1). There were no procedure-related complications within a median follow-up period of 16 months. CONCLUSIONS: Inadvertent arterial catheterisation during central venous cannulation is associated with obesity, emergency puncture and lack of ultrasonic guidance and should be suspected on retrograde/pulsatile catheter flow or local haematoma. If arterial catheterisation is recognised, the catheter should be left in place and the patient be referred for percutaneous/endovascular or surgical management.},
  author       = {Pikwer, Andreas and Acosta, Stefan and Kölbel, Tilo and Malina, Martin and Sonesson, Björn and Åkeson, Jonas},
  issn         = {1532-2165},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {707--714},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {European journal of vascular and endovascular surgery },
  title        = {Management of Inadvertent Arterial Catheterisation Associated with Central Venous Access Procedures.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejvs.2009.08.009},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2009},
}