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Interaction during intervention: conversations between professionals and children with cerebral palsy.

Holck, Pernille LU ; Dahlgren Sandberg, Annika LU and Nettelbladt, Ulrika LU (2009) In Communication & Medicine. An Interdisciplinary Journal of Healthcare, Ethics and Society 6(1). p.49-60
Abstract
To develop interactional ability, conversation with both peers and adults is vital. However, for children with physical impairments, like cerebral palsy, interactions with adults often dominate. In this study, interaction between eight Swedish children with cerebral palsy, mean age 8.6 years, and their physiotherapists (PTs) and speech-language therapists (SLTs) was analysed during intervention across 16 dyads. The analysis of data focused on how quantitative, interactional and topical dominance was manifested by the PTs and the SLTs. In addition, mitigating strategies and use of feedback was investigated. Surprisingly, the only significant finding was in topic maintenance, where the PTs' conversations were more directed towards topics... (More)
To develop interactional ability, conversation with both peers and adults is vital. However, for children with physical impairments, like cerebral palsy, interactions with adults often dominate. In this study, interaction between eight Swedish children with cerebral palsy, mean age 8.6 years, and their physiotherapists (PTs) and speech-language therapists (SLTs) was analysed during intervention across 16 dyads. The analysis of data focused on how quantitative, interactional and topical dominance was manifested by the PTs and the SLTs. In addition, mitigating strategies and use of feedback was investigated. Surprisingly, the only significant finding was in topic maintenance, where the PTs' conversations were more directed towards topics unrelated to the intervention context when compared to the conversations of the SLTs. Although not significant, the PTs tended to dominate by having a greater amount of talk, and the SLTs by asking many questions. It is discussed how the two professions may contribute to the development of interactional skills and pragmatic ability among children with cerebral palsy, given their professional training and focus of intervention. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cerebral Palsy: rehabilitation
in
Communication & Medicine. An Interdisciplinary Journal of Healthcare, Ethics and Society
volume
6
issue
1
pages
49 - 60
publisher
Equinox
external identifiers
  • pmid:19798835
  • scopus:70350050789
ISSN
1613-3625
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d229b7d3-e5f7-4fbf-bc3f-732d2f9ffd54 (old id 1500748)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19798835?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-11-04 13:10:06
date last changed
2017-11-24 09:06:36
@article{d229b7d3-e5f7-4fbf-bc3f-732d2f9ffd54,
  abstract     = {To develop interactional ability, conversation with both peers and adults is vital. However, for children with physical impairments, like cerebral palsy, interactions with adults often dominate. In this study, interaction between eight Swedish children with cerebral palsy, mean age 8.6 years, and their physiotherapists (PTs) and speech-language therapists (SLTs) was analysed during intervention across 16 dyads. The analysis of data focused on how quantitative, interactional and topical dominance was manifested by the PTs and the SLTs. In addition, mitigating strategies and use of feedback was investigated. Surprisingly, the only significant finding was in topic maintenance, where the PTs' conversations were more directed towards topics unrelated to the intervention context when compared to the conversations of the SLTs. Although not significant, the PTs tended to dominate by having a greater amount of talk, and the SLTs by asking many questions. It is discussed how the two professions may contribute to the development of interactional skills and pragmatic ability among children with cerebral palsy, given their professional training and focus of intervention.},
  author       = {Holck, Pernille and Dahlgren Sandberg, Annika and Nettelbladt, Ulrika},
  issn         = {1613-3625},
  keyword      = {Cerebral Palsy: rehabilitation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {49--60},
  publisher    = {Equinox},
  series       = {Communication & Medicine. An Interdisciplinary Journal of Healthcare, Ethics and Society},
  title        = {Interaction during intervention: conversations between professionals and children with cerebral palsy.},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2009},
}