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Experimental studies of blowfly (Calliphora stygia) longevity: A little dietary fat is beneficial but too much is detrimental

Ujvari, Beata ; Wallman, James F. ; Madsen, Thomas LU ; Whelan, Megan and Hulbert, A. J. (2009) In Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A 154(3). p.383-388
Abstract
This paper is one in a series of experimental studies on the effects of food composition on aging and longevity, using the golden-haired blowfly Calliphora stygia as the animal model Here we examine how diet. fat content affects blowfly life history traits such as longevity, reproduction, feeding rate, body mass, total fat content and membrane fatty acid composition. The highest median and maximum longevity was observed in blowflies fed on low fat diets, while high-fat diets caused more rapid death of the blowflies. A major result was that blowflies feeding on the lowest fat diet had the highest maximal lifespan demonstrating that low levels of diet fat enhanced blowfly lifespan. Diet also influenced gender-specific mortality rates;... (More)
This paper is one in a series of experimental studies on the effects of food composition on aging and longevity, using the golden-haired blowfly Calliphora stygia as the animal model Here we examine how diet. fat content affects blowfly life history traits such as longevity, reproduction, feeding rate, body mass, total fat content and membrane fatty acid composition. The highest median and maximum longevity was observed in blowflies fed on low fat diets, while high-fat diets caused more rapid death of the blowflies. A major result was that blowflies feeding on the lowest fat diet had the highest maximal lifespan demonstrating that low levels of diet fat enhanced blowfly lifespan. Diet also influenced gender-specific mortality rates; females lived longer on a high-fat diet, while males lived longer on a low fat diet. Furthermore, we provide data for and explain how blowfly feeding rates, egg production and male harassment affected blowfly longevity. Our results highlight the need for further studies to understand how dietary fats are metabolised and utilised in the golden-haired blowfly. (C) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
entomology, Forensic, Diet fat, Lifespan, Longevity, Blowfly, Calliphora stygia
in
Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A
volume
154
issue
3
pages
383 - 388
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000270770300014
  • scopus:70149103554
ISSN
1531-4332
DOI
10.1016/j.cbpa.2009.07.012
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Animal Ecology (Closed 2011) (011012001)
id
b0e4bdcf-c56e-4ee9-81c4-fc0ba2c2a4f7 (old id 1507010)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:32:13
date last changed
2021-08-11 02:51:02
@article{b0e4bdcf-c56e-4ee9-81c4-fc0ba2c2a4f7,
  abstract     = {This paper is one in a series of experimental studies on the effects of food composition on aging and longevity, using the golden-haired blowfly Calliphora stygia as the animal model Here we examine how diet. fat content affects blowfly life history traits such as longevity, reproduction, feeding rate, body mass, total fat content and membrane fatty acid composition. The highest median and maximum longevity was observed in blowflies fed on low fat diets, while high-fat diets caused more rapid death of the blowflies. A major result was that blowflies feeding on the lowest fat diet had the highest maximal lifespan demonstrating that low levels of diet fat enhanced blowfly lifespan. Diet also influenced gender-specific mortality rates; females lived longer on a high-fat diet, while males lived longer on a low fat diet. Furthermore, we provide data for and explain how blowfly feeding rates, egg production and male harassment affected blowfly longevity. Our results highlight the need for further studies to understand how dietary fats are metabolised and utilised in the golden-haired blowfly. (C) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Ujvari, Beata and Wallman, James F. and Madsen, Thomas and Whelan, Megan and Hulbert, A. J.},
  issn         = {1531-4332},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {383--388},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A},
  title        = {Experimental studies of blowfly (Calliphora stygia) longevity: A little dietary fat is beneficial but too much is detrimental},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2009.07.012},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.cbpa.2009.07.012},
  volume       = {154},
  year         = {2009},
}