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The optimal mode of delivery for the haemophilia carrier expecting an affected infant is vaginal delivery.

Ljung, Rolf LU (2010) In Haemophilia 16. p.415-419
Abstract
Summary. The optimal mode of delivery of a haemophilia carrier expecting a child is still a matter of uncertainty and debate. The aim of this commentary/review is to suggest that normal vaginal delivery should be the recommended mode of delivery for the majority of carriers, based on review of studies on obstetric aspects of haemophilia. About 2.0-4.0% of all haemophilia boys born in countries with a good standard of health care will suffer from ICH during the neonatal period. This is an average figure including all modes of delivery and regardless of whether the carrier status of the mother or the haemophilia status of the foetus was known or not at the time of delivery. On the basis of current literature, one may conclude that the risk... (More)
Summary. The optimal mode of delivery of a haemophilia carrier expecting a child is still a matter of uncertainty and debate. The aim of this commentary/review is to suggest that normal vaginal delivery should be the recommended mode of delivery for the majority of carriers, based on review of studies on obstetric aspects of haemophilia. About 2.0-4.0% of all haemophilia boys born in countries with a good standard of health care will suffer from ICH during the neonatal period. This is an average figure including all modes of delivery and regardless of whether the carrier status of the mother or the haemophilia status of the foetus was known or not at the time of delivery. On the basis of current literature, one may conclude that the risk of serious bleeding in the neonate affected with haemophilia is small in conjunction with normal vaginal delivery. It should be possible to further reduce the low frequency of complications if appropriate precautions are taken when planning the delivery in pregnant woman with known carrier status, if the sex of the foetus is known and, even more, when the haemophilia status of the foetus is known. Instrumental delivery such as use of vacuum extraction and foetal scalp monitors must be avoided at delivery of carriers. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Haemophilia
volume
16
pages
415 - 419
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000277001100001
  • pmid:19925629
  • scopus:77953560045
ISSN
1351-8216
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2516.2009.02144.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3a49352b-16be-4528-ba37-56f0f23d78e3 (old id 1511750)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19925629?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-12-03 15:20:19
date last changed
2018-06-10 04:47:56
@article{3a49352b-16be-4528-ba37-56f0f23d78e3,
  abstract     = {Summary. The optimal mode of delivery of a haemophilia carrier expecting a child is still a matter of uncertainty and debate. The aim of this commentary/review is to suggest that normal vaginal delivery should be the recommended mode of delivery for the majority of carriers, based on review of studies on obstetric aspects of haemophilia. About 2.0-4.0% of all haemophilia boys born in countries with a good standard of health care will suffer from ICH during the neonatal period. This is an average figure including all modes of delivery and regardless of whether the carrier status of the mother or the haemophilia status of the foetus was known or not at the time of delivery. On the basis of current literature, one may conclude that the risk of serious bleeding in the neonate affected with haemophilia is small in conjunction with normal vaginal delivery. It should be possible to further reduce the low frequency of complications if appropriate precautions are taken when planning the delivery in pregnant woman with known carrier status, if the sex of the foetus is known and, even more, when the haemophilia status of the foetus is known. Instrumental delivery such as use of vacuum extraction and foetal scalp monitors must be avoided at delivery of carriers.},
  author       = {Ljung, Rolf},
  issn         = {1351-8216},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {415--419},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Haemophilia},
  title        = {The optimal mode of delivery for the haemophilia carrier expecting an affected infant is vaginal delivery.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2516.2009.02144.x},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2010},
}