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Investigation of microcracks in ferroelectric materials by application of a grain--boundary--motivated cohesive law

Utzinger, J; Menzel, Andreas LU and Steinmann, P (2008) International Congress on Industrial Applied Mathematics and GAMM Annual Meeting, 2007 In PAMM 7(1). p.4070017-4070018
Abstract
Ferroelectric materials exhibit a huge potential for engineering applications - ranging from electrical actuators (inverse piezoelectric effect) to sensor technology (direct piezoelectric effect). To give an example, lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is a typical perovskite ion crystal possessing ferroelectric properties. In this contribution, we are particularly interested in the modelling of microcracking effects in ferroelectric materials. In view of Finite-Element-based simulations, the geometry of a natural grain structure, as observed on the so-called micro-level, is represented by an appropriate mesh. While the response on the grains themselves is approximated by coupled continuum elements, grain boundaries are numerically incorporated... (More)
Ferroelectric materials exhibit a huge potential for engineering applications - ranging from electrical actuators (inverse piezoelectric effect) to sensor technology (direct piezoelectric effect). To give an example, lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is a typical perovskite ion crystal possessing ferroelectric properties. In this contribution, we are particularly interested in the modelling of microcracking effects in ferroelectric materials. In view of Finite-Element-based simulations, the geometry of a natural grain structure, as observed on the so-called micro-level, is represented by an appropriate mesh. While the response on the grains themselves is approximated by coupled continuum elements, grain boundaries are numerically incorporated via so-called cohesive-type elements. For the sake of simplicity, switching effects in the bulk material will be neglected. The behaviour of the grain boundaries is modelled by means of cohesive-type laws. Identifying grain boundaries as potential failure zones leading to microcracking, cohesive-type elements consequently offer a great potential for numerical simulations. As an advantage, in the case of failure they do not a priori result in ill-conditioned systems of equations as compared with the application of standard continuum elements to localised deformations. Finally, representative constitutive relations for both the bulk material and the grain boundaries, enable two-dimensional studies of low-cycle-fatigue motivated benchmark boundary value problems. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
PAMM
volume
7
issue
1
pages
4070017 - 4070018
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
conference name
International Congress on Industrial Applied Mathematics and GAMM Annual Meeting, 2007
ISSN
1617-7061
DOI
10.1002/pamm.200700480
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8db95752-c3b1-4283-bf02-bb5911a05b51 (old id 1515161)
date added to LUP
2009-12-10 10:47:29
date last changed
2016-07-14 13:49:26
@inproceedings{8db95752-c3b1-4283-bf02-bb5911a05b51,
  abstract     = {Ferroelectric materials exhibit a huge potential for engineering applications - ranging from electrical actuators (inverse piezoelectric effect) to sensor technology (direct piezoelectric effect). To give an example, lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is a typical perovskite ion crystal possessing ferroelectric properties. In this contribution, we are particularly interested in the modelling of microcracking effects in ferroelectric materials. In view of Finite-Element-based simulations, the geometry of a natural grain structure, as observed on the so-called micro-level, is represented by an appropriate mesh. While the response on the grains themselves is approximated by coupled continuum elements, grain boundaries are numerically incorporated via so-called cohesive-type elements. For the sake of simplicity, switching effects in the bulk material will be neglected. The behaviour of the grain boundaries is modelled by means of cohesive-type laws. Identifying grain boundaries as potential failure zones leading to microcracking, cohesive-type elements consequently offer a great potential for numerical simulations. As an advantage, in the case of failure they do not a priori result in ill-conditioned systems of equations as compared with the application of standard continuum elements to localised deformations. Finally, representative constitutive relations for both the bulk material and the grain boundaries, enable two-dimensional studies of low-cycle-fatigue motivated benchmark boundary value problems.},
  author       = {Utzinger, J and Menzel, Andreas and Steinmann, P},
  booktitle    = {PAMM},
  issn         = {1617-7061},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {4070017--4070018},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  title        = {Investigation of microcracks in ferroelectric materials by application of a grain--boundary--motivated cohesive law},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pamm.200700480},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2008},
}