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Institutions, taxation, and market relationships in ancient Athens

Lyttkens, Carl Hampus LU (2010) In Journal of Institutional Economics 6. p.505-527
Abstract
This paper explores the institutional and economic development in ancient Athens from around 600 BC into the fourth century, a period during which the Athenians experienced oligarchy, tyranny, a gradually evolving but eventually far-reaching male democracy, followed by a return to more influence for the elite. Concomitantly, economic life changed qualitatively and quantitatively. Self-sufficient farming gradually gave way to market relationships and there was substantial economic growth. This analysis of institutional changes in Athens emphasizes the importance of credible commitments from those in power to other groups in society. It is furthermore likely that the increasing reliance on market relationships gradually transformed... (More)
This paper explores the institutional and economic development in ancient Athens from around 600 BC into the fourth century, a period during which the Athenians experienced oligarchy, tyranny, a gradually evolving but eventually far-reaching male democracy, followed by a return to more influence for the elite. Concomitantly, economic life changed qualitatively and quantitatively. Self-sufficient farming gradually gave way to market relationships and there was substantial economic growth. This analysis of institutional changes in Athens emphasizes the importance of credible commitments from those in power to other groups in society. It is furthermore likely that the increasing reliance on market relationships gradually transformed individual behaviour and individual beliefs, leading to changes in the formal and informal rules in society. Taxation played an important role: it pushed people into market relationships, illustrated the need for credible commitments, and helps to explain why foreigners were so prominent in trade in ancient Athens. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Institutional Economics
volume
6
pages
505 - 527
publisher
Cambridge University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000293181000004
ISSN
1744-1382
DOI
10.1017/S1744137410000159
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
646fed2c-0d3a-418c-9519-ff9309a5b141 (old id 1516916)
date added to LUP
2009-12-22 10:11:34
date last changed
2018-05-29 12:27:12
@article{646fed2c-0d3a-418c-9519-ff9309a5b141,
  abstract     = {This paper explores the institutional and economic development in ancient Athens from around 600 BC into the fourth century, a period during which the Athenians experienced oligarchy, tyranny, a gradually evolving but eventually far-reaching male democracy, followed by a return to more influence for the elite. Concomitantly, economic life changed qualitatively and quantitatively. Self-sufficient farming gradually gave way to market relationships and there was substantial economic growth. This analysis of institutional changes in Athens emphasizes the importance of credible commitments from those in power to other groups in society. It is furthermore likely that the increasing reliance on market relationships gradually transformed individual behaviour and individual beliefs, leading to changes in the formal and informal rules in society. Taxation played an important role: it pushed people into market relationships, illustrated the need for credible commitments, and helps to explain why foreigners were so prominent in trade in ancient Athens.},
  author       = {Lyttkens, Carl Hampus},
  issn         = {1744-1382},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {505--527},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {Journal of Institutional Economics},
  title        = {Institutions, taxation, and market relationships in ancient Athens},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1744137410000159},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2010},
}