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Ventilator-Supported Communication: A Case Study of Patient and Staff Experiences

Laakso, Katja LU ; Hartelius, Lena and Idvall, Markus LU (2009) In Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology 17(4). p.153-164
Abstract
Communicative abilities and opportunities are affected by ventilator care. The purpose of this case study was to investigate both a nurse's and a ventilator-supported patient's experiences of communication during ventilator care, with the overall aim of contributing to increased knowledge and awareness of issues related to communication with a ventilator-supported patient. An explorative/descriptive embedded single-case study design was applied, and a qualitative approach guided data collection and analysis. Initially, field observations were carried out in an intensive care unit (ICU) setting, and led to the development of the case (ventilator-supported communication) and the units of analysis. This was followed by semistructured... (More)
Communicative abilities and opportunities are affected by ventilator care. The purpose of this case study was to investigate both a nurse's and a ventilator-supported patient's experiences of communication during ventilator care, with the overall aim of contributing to increased knowledge and awareness of issues related to communication with a ventilator-supported patient. An explorative/descriptive embedded single-case study design was applied, and a qualitative approach guided data collection and analysis. Initially, field observations were carried out in an intensive care unit (ICU) setting, and led to the development of the case (ventilator-supported communication) and the units of analysis. This was followed by semistructured interviews with the participants: an individual receiving home mechanical ventilation (HMV) and a nurse from an ICU setting. Interviews were analyzed according to thematic content analysis. Five main categories emerged from the analysis: (1) to understand and to make oneself understood is important, (2) allowing communication to take time, (3) it takes practice to learn how to speak on a ventilator, (4) different situations require different communicative strategies and (5) knowing a person facilitates communication. The findings are discussed in relation to communicative participation, and suggestions for future research are given. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology
volume
17
issue
4
pages
153 - 164
publisher
Delmar Cengage Learning
external identifiers
  • wos:000271895900002
  • scopus:79952387218
ISSN
1065-1438
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7c0b50a4-c639-4aa5-a54f-e6a10fe2ccd0 (old id 1518260)
date added to LUP
2010-01-08 14:37:08
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:18:01
@article{7c0b50a4-c639-4aa5-a54f-e6a10fe2ccd0,
  abstract     = {Communicative abilities and opportunities are affected by ventilator care. The purpose of this case study was to investigate both a nurse's and a ventilator-supported patient's experiences of communication during ventilator care, with the overall aim of contributing to increased knowledge and awareness of issues related to communication with a ventilator-supported patient. An explorative/descriptive embedded single-case study design was applied, and a qualitative approach guided data collection and analysis. Initially, field observations were carried out in an intensive care unit (ICU) setting, and led to the development of the case (ventilator-supported communication) and the units of analysis. This was followed by semistructured interviews with the participants: an individual receiving home mechanical ventilation (HMV) and a nurse from an ICU setting. Interviews were analyzed according to thematic content analysis. Five main categories emerged from the analysis: (1) to understand and to make oneself understood is important, (2) allowing communication to take time, (3) it takes practice to learn how to speak on a ventilator, (4) different situations require different communicative strategies and (5) knowing a person facilitates communication. The findings are discussed in relation to communicative participation, and suggestions for future research are given.},
  author       = {Laakso, Katja and Hartelius, Lena and Idvall, Markus},
  issn         = {1065-1438},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {153--164},
  publisher    = {Delmar Cengage Learning},
  series       = {Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology},
  title        = {Ventilator-Supported Communication: A Case Study of Patient and Staff Experiences},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2009},
}