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Linoleic acid, a dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid, and the aetiology of ulcerative colitis: a nested case-control study within a European prospective cohort study

Tjonneland, A.; Olsen, A.; Overvad, K.; Bergmann, M. M.; Boeing, H.; Nagel, G.; Linseisen, J.; Hallmans, G.; Palmqvist, R. and Sjodin, H., et al. (2009) In Gut 58(12). p.1606-1611
Abstract
Objective: Dietary linoleic acid, an n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is metabolised to arachidonic acid, a component of colonocyte membranes. Metabolites of arachidonic acid have pro-inflammatory properties and are increased in the mucosa of patients with ulcerative colitis. The aim of this investigation was to conduct the first prospective cohort study investigating if a high dietary intake of linoleic acid increases the risk of developing incident ulcerative colitis. Design and setting: Dietary data from food frequency questionnaires were available for 203 193 men and women aged 30-74 years, resident in the UK, Sweden, Denmark, Germany or Italy and participating in a prospective cohort study, the European Prospective Investigation into... (More)
Objective: Dietary linoleic acid, an n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is metabolised to arachidonic acid, a component of colonocyte membranes. Metabolites of arachidonic acid have pro-inflammatory properties and are increased in the mucosa of patients with ulcerative colitis. The aim of this investigation was to conduct the first prospective cohort study investigating if a high dietary intake of linoleic acid increases the risk of developing incident ulcerative colitis. Design and setting: Dietary data from food frequency questionnaires were available for 203 193 men and women aged 30-74 years, resident in the UK, Sweden, Denmark, Germany or Italy and participating in a prospective cohort study, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). These participants were followed up for the diagnosis of ulcerative colitis. Each case was matched with four controls and the risk of disease calculated by quartile of intake of linoleic acid adjusted for gender, age, smoking, total energy intake and centre. Results: A total of 126 participants developed ulcerative colitis (47% women) after a median follow-up of 4.0 years (range, 1.7-11.3 years). The highest quartile of intake of linoleic acid was associated with an increased risk of ulcerative colitis (odds ratio (OR) = 2.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.23 to 5.07, p = 0.01) with a significant trend across quartiles (OR = 1.32 per quartile increase, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.66, p = 0.02 for trend). Conclusions: The data support a role for dietary linoleic acid in the aetiology of ulcerative colitis. An estimated 30% of cases could be attributed to having dietary intakes higher than the lowest quartile of linoleic acid intake. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Gut
volume
58
issue
12
pages
1606 - 1611
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000271911900012
  • scopus:72549092109
ISSN
1468-3288
DOI
10.1136/gut.2008.169078
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f0691377-d7ba-418a-b93c-f3f0f156618f (old id 1518382)
date added to LUP
2010-01-07 15:47:21
date last changed
2017-12-10 03:56:56
@article{f0691377-d7ba-418a-b93c-f3f0f156618f,
  abstract     = {Objective: Dietary linoleic acid, an n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is metabolised to arachidonic acid, a component of colonocyte membranes. Metabolites of arachidonic acid have pro-inflammatory properties and are increased in the mucosa of patients with ulcerative colitis. The aim of this investigation was to conduct the first prospective cohort study investigating if a high dietary intake of linoleic acid increases the risk of developing incident ulcerative colitis. Design and setting: Dietary data from food frequency questionnaires were available for 203 193 men and women aged 30-74 years, resident in the UK, Sweden, Denmark, Germany or Italy and participating in a prospective cohort study, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). These participants were followed up for the diagnosis of ulcerative colitis. Each case was matched with four controls and the risk of disease calculated by quartile of intake of linoleic acid adjusted for gender, age, smoking, total energy intake and centre. Results: A total of 126 participants developed ulcerative colitis (47% women) after a median follow-up of 4.0 years (range, 1.7-11.3 years). The highest quartile of intake of linoleic acid was associated with an increased risk of ulcerative colitis (odds ratio (OR) = 2.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.23 to 5.07, p = 0.01) with a significant trend across quartiles (OR = 1.32 per quartile increase, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.66, p = 0.02 for trend). Conclusions: The data support a role for dietary linoleic acid in the aetiology of ulcerative colitis. An estimated 30% of cases could be attributed to having dietary intakes higher than the lowest quartile of linoleic acid intake.},
  author       = {Tjonneland, A. and Olsen, A. and Overvad, K. and Bergmann, M. M. and Boeing, H. and Nagel, G. and Linseisen, J. and Hallmans, G. and Palmqvist, R. and Sjodin, H. and Hagglund, G. and Berglund, Göran and Lindgren, Stefan and Grip, Olof and Palli, D. and Masala, G. and Day, N. E. and Luben, R. and Welch, A. and Khaw, K. -T and Bingham, S. and Riboli, E. and Kennedy, H. and Hart, A. and Danielsson, A.},
  issn         = {1468-3288},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1606--1611},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {Gut},
  title        = {Linoleic acid, a dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid, and the aetiology of ulcerative colitis: a nested case-control study within a European prospective cohort study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gut.2008.169078},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {2009},
}