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Quantitative Genetic Effects of Bottlenecks: Experimental Evidence from a Wild Plant Species, Nigella degenii.

Andersson, Stefan LU ; Ellmer, Maarten LU ; Jörgensen, Tove LU and Palmé, Anna LU (2010) In Journal of Heredity 101. p.298-307
Abstract
Understanding the genetic consequences of changes in population size is fundamental in a variety of contexts, such as adaptation and conservation biology. In the study presented here, we have performed a replicated experiment with the plant Nigella degenii to explore the quantitative genetic effects of a single-founder bottleneck. In agreement with additive theory, the bottleneck reduced the mean (co)variance within lines and caused stochastic, line-specific changes in the genetic (co)variance structure. However, a significant portion of the (co)variance structure was conserved, and 2 characters-leaf and flower (sepal) size-turned out to be positively correlated in all data sets, indicating a potential for correlated evolution in these... (More)
Understanding the genetic consequences of changes in population size is fundamental in a variety of contexts, such as adaptation and conservation biology. In the study presented here, we have performed a replicated experiment with the plant Nigella degenii to explore the quantitative genetic effects of a single-founder bottleneck. In agreement with additive theory, the bottleneck reduced the mean (co)variance within lines and caused stochastic, line-specific changes in the genetic (co)variance structure. However, a significant portion of the (co)variance structure was conserved, and 2 characters-leaf and flower (sepal) size-turned out to be positively correlated in all data sets, indicating a potential for correlated evolution in these characters, even after a severe bottleneck. The hierarchical partitioning of genetic variance for flower size was in good agreement with predictions from additive theory, whereas the remaining characters showed an excess of within-line variance and a deficiency of among-line variance. The latter discrepancies were most likely a result of selection, given the small proportion of lines (23%) that remained viable until the end of the experiment. Our results suggest that bottlenecked populations of N. degenii generally have a lower adaptive potential than the ancestral population but also highlight the idiosyncratic nature of bottleneck effects. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Heredity
volume
101
pages
298 - 307
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000276747000005
  • scopus:77951694935
ISSN
0022-1503
DOI
10.1093/jhered/esp108
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8e6375ee-a1a3-470d-a435-053fddedf368 (old id 1524182)
date added to LUP
2010-01-11 12:11:41
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:40:41
@article{8e6375ee-a1a3-470d-a435-053fddedf368,
  abstract     = {Understanding the genetic consequences of changes in population size is fundamental in a variety of contexts, such as adaptation and conservation biology. In the study presented here, we have performed a replicated experiment with the plant Nigella degenii to explore the quantitative genetic effects of a single-founder bottleneck. In agreement with additive theory, the bottleneck reduced the mean (co)variance within lines and caused stochastic, line-specific changes in the genetic (co)variance structure. However, a significant portion of the (co)variance structure was conserved, and 2 characters-leaf and flower (sepal) size-turned out to be positively correlated in all data sets, indicating a potential for correlated evolution in these characters, even after a severe bottleneck. The hierarchical partitioning of genetic variance for flower size was in good agreement with predictions from additive theory, whereas the remaining characters showed an excess of within-line variance and a deficiency of among-line variance. The latter discrepancies were most likely a result of selection, given the small proportion of lines (23%) that remained viable until the end of the experiment. Our results suggest that bottlenecked populations of N. degenii generally have a lower adaptive potential than the ancestral population but also highlight the idiosyncratic nature of bottleneck effects.},
  author       = {Andersson, Stefan and Ellmer, Maarten and Jörgensen, Tove and Palmé, Anna},
  issn         = {0022-1503},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {298--307},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Journal of Heredity},
  title        = {Quantitative Genetic Effects of Bottlenecks: Experimental Evidence from a Wild Plant Species, Nigella degenii.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jhered/esp108},
  volume       = {101},
  year         = {2010},
}