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Lactobacilli in the intestinal microbiota of Swedish infants

Ahrné, Siv LU ; Lonnermark, E; Wold, A E; Aberg, N; Hesselmar, B; Saalman, R; Strannegard, I L; Molin, Göran LU and Adlerberth, I (2005) In Microbes and Infection 7(11-12). p.1256-1262
Abstract
Lactobacillus colonisation was examined in 112 Swedish infants. Faecal samples obtained at 1, 2,4 and 8 weeks and at 6, 12 and 18 months of age were cultivated quantitatively on Rogosa agar. Lactobacilli were speciated by PCR and typed to the strain level by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Lactobacilli reached a peak at 6 months when 45% of the infants were colonised. L. rhamnosus and L. gasseri were the most common species in this period. Colonisation by lactobacilli in general (P < 0.01) and L. rhamnosus in particular (P < 0.05) was more common in breast-fed than in weaned infants at 6 months of age. Lactobacillus isolation reached a nadir of 17% by 12 months (P < 0.0001), but increased to 31% by 18 months of age (P... (More)
Lactobacillus colonisation was examined in 112 Swedish infants. Faecal samples obtained at 1, 2,4 and 8 weeks and at 6, 12 and 18 months of age were cultivated quantitatively on Rogosa agar. Lactobacilli were speciated by PCR and typed to the strain level by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Lactobacilli reached a peak at 6 months when 45% of the infants were colonised. L. rhamnosus and L. gasseri were the most common species in this period. Colonisation by lactobacilli in general (P < 0.01) and L. rhamnosus in particular (P < 0.05) was more common in breast-fed than in weaned infants at 6 months of age. Lactobacillus isolation reached a nadir of 17% by 12 months (P < 0.0001), but increased to 31% by 18 months of age (P < 0.05). The food-related species L. paracasei, L. plantarum, L. acidophilus and L. delbrueckii dominated in this second phase. A single strain persisted for at least 3 weeks in 17% of the infants during the first 6 months, most commonly L. rhamnosus. Lactobacillus population counts in colonised infants increased from 10(6.4) cfu/g at I week to 10(8.8) cfu/g at 6 months, and then dropped to 10(5.4) cfu/g faeces at 12 months of age. Lactobacillus colonisation was not significantly related to delivery mode, or to presence of siblings or pets in the household. Our results suggest that certain Lactobacillus species, especially L. rhamnosus, thrive in the intestinal flora of breast-fed infants. After weaning they are replaced by other Lactobacillus species of types found in food. (c) 2005 Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Lactobacillus, Infant, Colonisation, Intestine
in
Microbes and Infection
volume
7
issue
11-12
pages
1256 - 1262
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000233099800010
  • scopus:26944468650
ISSN
1769-714X
DOI
10.1016/j.micinf.2005.04.011
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b11d3ddd-bf94-4a48-8c71-7cf8acb9bd3c (old id 152829)
date added to LUP
2007-07-18 12:16:45
date last changed
2017-08-20 03:45:24
@article{b11d3ddd-bf94-4a48-8c71-7cf8acb9bd3c,
  abstract     = {Lactobacillus colonisation was examined in 112 Swedish infants. Faecal samples obtained at 1, 2,4 and 8 weeks and at 6, 12 and 18 months of age were cultivated quantitatively on Rogosa agar. Lactobacilli were speciated by PCR and typed to the strain level by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Lactobacilli reached a peak at 6 months when 45% of the infants were colonised. L. rhamnosus and L. gasseri were the most common species in this period. Colonisation by lactobacilli in general (P &lt; 0.01) and L. rhamnosus in particular (P &lt; 0.05) was more common in breast-fed than in weaned infants at 6 months of age. Lactobacillus isolation reached a nadir of 17% by 12 months (P &lt; 0.0001), but increased to 31% by 18 months of age (P &lt; 0.05). The food-related species L. paracasei, L. plantarum, L. acidophilus and L. delbrueckii dominated in this second phase. A single strain persisted for at least 3 weeks in 17% of the infants during the first 6 months, most commonly L. rhamnosus. Lactobacillus population counts in colonised infants increased from 10(6.4) cfu/g at I week to 10(8.8) cfu/g at 6 months, and then dropped to 10(5.4) cfu/g faeces at 12 months of age. Lactobacillus colonisation was not significantly related to delivery mode, or to presence of siblings or pets in the household. Our results suggest that certain Lactobacillus species, especially L. rhamnosus, thrive in the intestinal flora of breast-fed infants. After weaning they are replaced by other Lactobacillus species of types found in food. (c) 2005 Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Ahrné, Siv and Lonnermark, E and Wold, A E and Aberg, N and Hesselmar, B and Saalman, R and Strannegard, I L and Molin, Göran and Adlerberth, I},
  issn         = {1769-714X},
  keyword      = {Lactobacillus,Infant,Colonisation,Intestine},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11-12},
  pages        = {1256--1262},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Microbes and Infection},
  title        = {Lactobacilli in the intestinal microbiota of Swedish infants},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micinf.2005.04.011},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2005},
}