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Social capital and lack of belief in the possibility to influence one's own health: a population-based study.

Lindström, Martin LU (2006) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 34(1). p.69-75
Abstract
Objectives: To study the impact of social capital (social participation and trust) on lack of belief in possibility to influence health. Methods: The Scania 2000 public-health survey is a cross-sectional, postal questionnaire study including 13,604 persons aged 18-80 years which was conducted in 2000 by the regional healthcare authorities in Region Skåne, southern Sweden, to investigate health-related risk factors in the population. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between social capital and lack of belief in possibility to influence health. The multivariate analyses analysed the importance of confounders on the differences in lack of belief in possibility to influence health according to the social... (More)
Objectives: To study the impact of social capital (social participation and trust) on lack of belief in possibility to influence health. Methods: The Scania 2000 public-health survey is a cross-sectional, postal questionnaire study including 13,604 persons aged 18-80 years which was conducted in 2000 by the regional healthcare authorities in Region Skåne, southern Sweden, to investigate health-related risk factors in the population. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between social capital and lack of belief in possibility to influence health. The multivariate analyses analysed the importance of confounders on the differences in lack of belief in possibility to influence health according to the social capital variables. Results: In total, 31.0% of all men and 33.5% of all women lack belief in the possibility to influence their own health. Lack of belief in possibility to influence health was positively associated with both low social participation and low trust, although stronger for social participation than for trust. Conclusions: Low levels of social capital, particularly low social participation, is positively associated with lack of belief in the possibility to influence one's own health. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
social participation, social capital, miniaturization of community, Health belief, locus of control, trust
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
volume
34
issue
1
pages
69 - 75
publisher
SAGE Publications
external identifiers
  • wos:000235002200010
  • pmid:16449046
  • pmid:16449046
  • scopus:32144437595
ISSN
1651-1905
DOI
10.1080/14034940510032167
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
97e4f38e-749a-4c0d-9a74-6bc26849b857 (old id 153716)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 17:02:10
date last changed
2020-12-29 04:46:33
@article{97e4f38e-749a-4c0d-9a74-6bc26849b857,
  abstract     = {Objectives: To study the impact of social capital (social participation and trust) on lack of belief in possibility to influence health. Methods: The Scania 2000 public-health survey is a cross-sectional, postal questionnaire study including 13,604 persons aged 18-80 years which was conducted in 2000 by the regional healthcare authorities in Region Skåne, southern Sweden, to investigate health-related risk factors in the population. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between social capital and lack of belief in possibility to influence health. The multivariate analyses analysed the importance of confounders on the differences in lack of belief in possibility to influence health according to the social capital variables. Results: In total, 31.0% of all men and 33.5% of all women lack belief in the possibility to influence their own health. Lack of belief in possibility to influence health was positively associated with both low social participation and low trust, although stronger for social participation than for trust. Conclusions: Low levels of social capital, particularly low social participation, is positively associated with lack of belief in the possibility to influence one's own health.},
  author       = {Lindström, Martin},
  issn         = {1651-1905},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {69--75},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Social capital and lack of belief in the possibility to influence one's own health: a population-based study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14034940510032167},
  doi          = {10.1080/14034940510032167},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2006},
}