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Estimation of Short-Term Effects of Air Pollution on Stroke Hospital Admissions in Southern Sweden.

Oudin, Anna LU ; Strömberg, Ulf LU ; Jakobsson, Kristina LU ; Stroh, Emilie LU and Björk, Jonas LU (2010) In Neuroepidemiology 34(3). p.131-142
Abstract
Background: Short-term exposure to high levels of air pollution can increase stroke risk. In this study we investigated the short-term effects of air pollution on hospital admissions for stroke in a setting where pollutant levels are rather low. We also addressed methodological issues in evaluating the short-term effects of air pollution. Methods: Daily admissions of ischemic (n = 11,267) and hemorrhagic (n = 1,681) stroke were obtained from a Swedish quality register for stroke, Riks-Stroke. We used two types of exposure data: (1) daily measured background levels of ozone, temperature and particles with a diameter <10 mum (PM(10)) and (2) modeled levels of a mixture of NO and NO(2) (NO(x)) at the residential address of each individual.... (More)
Background: Short-term exposure to high levels of air pollution can increase stroke risk. In this study we investigated the short-term effects of air pollution on hospital admissions for stroke in a setting where pollutant levels are rather low. We also addressed methodological issues in evaluating the short-term effects of air pollution. Methods: Daily admissions of ischemic (n = 11,267) and hemorrhagic (n = 1,681) stroke were obtained from a Swedish quality register for stroke, Riks-Stroke. We used two types of exposure data: (1) daily measured background levels of ozone, temperature and particles with a diameter <10 mum (PM(10)) and (2) modeled levels of a mixture of NO and NO(2) (NO(x)) at the residential address of each individual. Results: We estimated a 13% (95% confidence interval, 4-22%) increased risk for hospital admissions for ischemic stroke for levels of PM(10) above 30 mug/m(3) compared to <15 mug/m(3), whereas temperature above 16 degrees C decreased the risk. No consistent associations were found for hemorrhagic stroke or for ischemic stroke and ozone or NO(x). Conclusion: Particulate air pollution and temperature seemed to be associated with ischemic stroke hospital admissions. Individual exposure modeling facilitates a detailed exposure assessment but may also be more prone to misclassification errors. The time series and case crossover approaches yielded similar effect estimates. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Neuroepidemiology
volume
34
issue
3
pages
131 - 142
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000274315000001
  • pmid:20068360
  • scopus:73649101773
ISSN
1423-0208
DOI
10.1159/000274807
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d589e55c-dd0b-40a6-983c-7ff3f727e46d (old id 1541143)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20068360?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-02-02 13:40:22
date last changed
2018-06-17 04:57:21
@article{d589e55c-dd0b-40a6-983c-7ff3f727e46d,
  abstract     = {Background: Short-term exposure to high levels of air pollution can increase stroke risk. In this study we investigated the short-term effects of air pollution on hospital admissions for stroke in a setting where pollutant levels are rather low. We also addressed methodological issues in evaluating the short-term effects of air pollution. Methods: Daily admissions of ischemic (n = 11,267) and hemorrhagic (n = 1,681) stroke were obtained from a Swedish quality register for stroke, Riks-Stroke. We used two types of exposure data: (1) daily measured background levels of ozone, temperature and particles with a diameter &lt;10 mum (PM(10)) and (2) modeled levels of a mixture of NO and NO(2) (NO(x)) at the residential address of each individual. Results: We estimated a 13% (95% confidence interval, 4-22%) increased risk for hospital admissions for ischemic stroke for levels of PM(10) above 30 mug/m(3) compared to &lt;15 mug/m(3), whereas temperature above 16 degrees C decreased the risk. No consistent associations were found for hemorrhagic stroke or for ischemic stroke and ozone or NO(x). Conclusion: Particulate air pollution and temperature seemed to be associated with ischemic stroke hospital admissions. Individual exposure modeling facilitates a detailed exposure assessment but may also be more prone to misclassification errors. The time series and case crossover approaches yielded similar effect estimates.},
  author       = {Oudin, Anna and Strömberg, Ulf and Jakobsson, Kristina and Stroh, Emilie and Björk, Jonas},
  issn         = {1423-0208},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {131--142},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Neuroepidemiology},
  title        = {Estimation of Short-Term Effects of Air Pollution on Stroke Hospital Admissions in Southern Sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000274807},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2010},
}