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Don’t blame yourself : Conscious source monitoring modulates feedback control during speech production

Franken, Matthias K. ; Hartsuiker, Robert J. ; Johansson, Petter LU ; Hall, Lars LU and Lind, Andreas LU (2023) In Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 76(1). p.15-27
Abstract

Sensory feedback plays an important role in speech motor control. One of the main sources of evidence for this is studies in which online auditory feedback is perturbed during ongoing speech. In motor control, it is therefore crucial to distinguish between sensory feedback and externally generated sensory events. This is called source monitoring. Previous altered feedback studies have taken non-conscious source monitoring for granted, as automatic responses to altered sensory feedback imply that the feedback changes are processed as self-caused. However, the role of conscious source monitoring is unclear. The current study investigated whether conscious source monitoring modulates responses to unexpected pitch changes in auditory... (More)

Sensory feedback plays an important role in speech motor control. One of the main sources of evidence for this is studies in which online auditory feedback is perturbed during ongoing speech. In motor control, it is therefore crucial to distinguish between sensory feedback and externally generated sensory events. This is called source monitoring. Previous altered feedback studies have taken non-conscious source monitoring for granted, as automatic responses to altered sensory feedback imply that the feedback changes are processed as self-caused. However, the role of conscious source monitoring is unclear. The current study investigated whether conscious source monitoring modulates responses to unexpected pitch changes in auditory feedback. During the first block, some participants spontaneously attributed the pitch shifts to themselves (self-blamers) while others attributed them to an external source (other-blamers). Before Block 2, all participants were informed that the pitch shifts were experimentally induced. The self-blamers then showed a reduction in response magnitude in Block 2 compared with Block 1, while the other-blamers did not. This suggests that conscious source monitoring modulates responses to altered auditory feedback, such that consciously ascribing feedback to oneself leads to larger compensation responses. These results can be accounted for within the dominant comparator framework, where conscious source monitoring could modulate the gain on sensory feedback. Alternatively, the results can be naturally explained from an inferential framework, where conscious knowledge may bias the priors in a Bayesian process to determine the most likely source of a sensory event.

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author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
auditory feedback, pitch, sense of agency, Source monitoring, speech motor control, speech production
in
Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
volume
76
issue
1
pages
15 - 27
publisher
SAGE Publications
external identifiers
  • scopus:85124609668
  • pmid:35014590
ISSN
1747-0218
DOI
10.1177/17470218221075632
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1541741c-02c6-4782-aaf5-ef143a6d53fe
date added to LUP
2022-04-14 12:06:51
date last changed
2024-02-08 14:16:30
@article{1541741c-02c6-4782-aaf5-ef143a6d53fe,
  abstract     = {{<p>Sensory feedback plays an important role in speech motor control. One of the main sources of evidence for this is studies in which online auditory feedback is perturbed during ongoing speech. In motor control, it is therefore crucial to distinguish between sensory feedback and externally generated sensory events. This is called source monitoring. Previous altered feedback studies have taken non-conscious source monitoring for granted, as automatic responses to altered sensory feedback imply that the feedback changes are processed as self-caused. However, the role of conscious source monitoring is unclear. The current study investigated whether conscious source monitoring modulates responses to unexpected pitch changes in auditory feedback. During the first block, some participants spontaneously attributed the pitch shifts to themselves (self-blamers) while others attributed them to an external source (other-blamers). Before Block 2, all participants were informed that the pitch shifts were experimentally induced. The self-blamers then showed a reduction in response magnitude in Block 2 compared with Block 1, while the other-blamers did not. This suggests that conscious source monitoring modulates responses to altered auditory feedback, such that consciously ascribing feedback to oneself leads to larger compensation responses. These results can be accounted for within the dominant comparator framework, where conscious source monitoring could modulate the gain on sensory feedback. Alternatively, the results can be naturally explained from an inferential framework, where conscious knowledge may bias the priors in a Bayesian process to determine the most likely source of a sensory event.</p>}},
  author       = {{Franken, Matthias K. and Hartsuiker, Robert J. and Johansson, Petter and Hall, Lars and Lind, Andreas}},
  issn         = {{1747-0218}},
  keywords     = {{auditory feedback; pitch; sense of agency; Source monitoring; speech motor control; speech production}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{1}},
  pages        = {{15--27}},
  publisher    = {{SAGE Publications}},
  series       = {{Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology}},
  title        = {{Don’t blame yourself : Conscious source monitoring modulates feedback control during speech production}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/17470218221075632}},
  doi          = {{10.1177/17470218221075632}},
  volume       = {{76}},
  year         = {{2023}},
}