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Cadmium, mercury, and lead in kidney cortex of living kidney donors: Impact of different exposure sources

Barregard, Lars; Fabricius-Lagging, Elisabeth; Lundh, Thomas LU ; Molne, Johan; Wallin, Maria; Olausson, Michael; Modigh, Cecilia and Sallsten, Gerd (2010) In Environmental Research 110(1). p.47-54
Abstract
Background: Most current knowledge on kidney concentrations of nephrotoxic metals like cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), or lead (Pb) comes from autopsy studies. Assessment of metal concentrations in kidney biopsies from living subjects can be combined with information about exposure sources like smoking, diet, and occupation supplied by the biopsied subjects themselves. Objectives: To determine kidney concentrations of Cd, Hg, and Pb in living kidney donors, and assess associations with common exposure sources and background factors. Methods: Metal concentrations were determined in 109 living kidney donors aged 24-70 years (median 51), using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (Cd and Pb) and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry... (More)
Background: Most current knowledge on kidney concentrations of nephrotoxic metals like cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), or lead (Pb) comes from autopsy studies. Assessment of metal concentrations in kidney biopsies from living subjects can be combined with information about exposure sources like smoking, diet, and occupation supplied by the biopsied subjects themselves. Objectives: To determine kidney concentrations of Cd, Hg, and Pb in living kidney donors, and assess associations with common exposure sources and background factors. Methods: Metal concentrations were determined in 109 living kidney donors aged 24-70 years (median 51), using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (Cd and Pb) and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (Hg). Smoking habits, occupation, dental amalgam. fish consumption, and iron stores were evaluated. Results: The median kidney concentrations were 12.9 mu g/g (wet weight) for cadmium, 0.21 mu g/g for mercury, and 0.08 mu g/g for lead. Kidney Cd increased by 3.9 mu g/g for a 10 year increase in age, and by 3.7 mu g/g for an extra 10 pack-years of smoking. Levels in non-smokers were similar to those found in the 1970s. Low iron stores (low serum ferritin) in women increased kidney Cd by 4.5 mu g/g. Kidney Hg increased by 6% for every additional amalgam surface, but was not associated with fish consumption. Lead was unaffected by the background factors surveyed. Conclusions: In Sweden, kidney Cd levels have decreased due to less smoking, while the impact of diet seems unchanged. Dental amalgam is the main determinant of kidney Hg. Kidney Pb levels are very low due to decreased exposure. (C) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Donor, Kidney, Lead, Cadmium, Mercury
in
Environmental Research
volume
110
issue
1
pages
47 - 54
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000273942000007
  • scopus:71249154769
ISSN
1096-0953
DOI
10.1016/j.envres.2009.10.010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c67fbee7-7fcc-4636-ab03-1e7600e7d351 (old id 1547003)
date added to LUP
2010-02-24 11:43:45
date last changed
2018-06-17 03:27:50
@article{c67fbee7-7fcc-4636-ab03-1e7600e7d351,
  abstract     = {Background: Most current knowledge on kidney concentrations of nephrotoxic metals like cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), or lead (Pb) comes from autopsy studies. Assessment of metal concentrations in kidney biopsies from living subjects can be combined with information about exposure sources like smoking, diet, and occupation supplied by the biopsied subjects themselves. Objectives: To determine kidney concentrations of Cd, Hg, and Pb in living kidney donors, and assess associations with common exposure sources and background factors. Methods: Metal concentrations were determined in 109 living kidney donors aged 24-70 years (median 51), using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (Cd and Pb) and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (Hg). Smoking habits, occupation, dental amalgam. fish consumption, and iron stores were evaluated. Results: The median kidney concentrations were 12.9 mu g/g (wet weight) for cadmium, 0.21 mu g/g for mercury, and 0.08 mu g/g for lead. Kidney Cd increased by 3.9 mu g/g for a 10 year increase in age, and by 3.7 mu g/g for an extra 10 pack-years of smoking. Levels in non-smokers were similar to those found in the 1970s. Low iron stores (low serum ferritin) in women increased kidney Cd by 4.5 mu g/g. Kidney Hg increased by 6% for every additional amalgam surface, but was not associated with fish consumption. Lead was unaffected by the background factors surveyed. Conclusions: In Sweden, kidney Cd levels have decreased due to less smoking, while the impact of diet seems unchanged. Dental amalgam is the main determinant of kidney Hg. Kidney Pb levels are very low due to decreased exposure. (C) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Barregard, Lars and Fabricius-Lagging, Elisabeth and Lundh, Thomas and Molne, Johan and Wallin, Maria and Olausson, Michael and Modigh, Cecilia and Sallsten, Gerd},
  issn         = {1096-0953},
  keyword      = {Donor,Kidney,Lead,Cadmium,Mercury},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {47--54},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Environmental Research},
  title        = {Cadmium, mercury, and lead in kidney cortex of living kidney donors: Impact of different exposure sources},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2009.10.010},
  volume       = {110},
  year         = {2010},
}