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Flight feather shaft structure of two warbler species with different moult schedules: a study using high-resolution X-ray imaging

Weber, Thomas LU ; Kranenbarg, S.; Hedenström, Anders LU ; Waarsing, J. H. and Weinans, H. (2010) In Journal of Zoology 280(2). p.163-170
Abstract
Plumage constitutes a significant component of the somatic investment of birds. A detailed investigation of feathers and moult can help to uncover trade-offs involved in somatic investment decisions, the sources of some of the costs birds have to pay and the potential fitness consequences. We used micro-computed tomography imaging to study the second moment of area, a structural parameter that is one determinant of bending stiffness and the cortex volume of flight feather shafts of two sister taxa, the willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus, a migratory species with two annual moults, and the chiffchaff Phylloscopus collybita, a migrant with one annual post-nuptial moult. Juvenile and adult willow warbler and chiffchaff feathers, all grown... (More)
Plumage constitutes a significant component of the somatic investment of birds. A detailed investigation of feathers and moult can help to uncover trade-offs involved in somatic investment decisions, the sources of some of the costs birds have to pay and the potential fitness consequences. We used micro-computed tomography imaging to study the second moment of area, a structural parameter that is one determinant of bending stiffness and the cortex volume of flight feather shafts of two sister taxa, the willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus, a migratory species with two annual moults, and the chiffchaff Phylloscopus collybita, a migrant with one annual post-nuptial moult. Juvenile and adult willow warbler and chiffchaff feathers, all grown on the breeding grounds, are structurally very similar to each other. Willow warbler feathers grown during moult on the wintering grounds, however, have a significantly higher second moment of area and a significantly larger cortex volume than all the other feather types. We discuss the possibility that the seasonal variability of willow warbler feathers may be an adaptive structural reflection of a moult-migration strategy that has allowed this species to occupy large breeding and wintering ranges. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
chiffchaff, willow warbler, migration, moult, rachis, mu-CT imaging
in
Journal of Zoology
volume
280
issue
2
pages
163 - 170
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000273951800003
  • scopus:79955153808
ISSN
0952-8369
DOI
10.1111/j.1469-7998.2009.00644.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c10166a5-92db-4bc3-a3d0-af1321998700 (old id 1547255)
date added to LUP
2010-02-24 10:52:12
date last changed
2018-05-29 12:02:35
@article{c10166a5-92db-4bc3-a3d0-af1321998700,
  abstract     = {Plumage constitutes a significant component of the somatic investment of birds. A detailed investigation of feathers and moult can help to uncover trade-offs involved in somatic investment decisions, the sources of some of the costs birds have to pay and the potential fitness consequences. We used micro-computed tomography imaging to study the second moment of area, a structural parameter that is one determinant of bending stiffness and the cortex volume of flight feather shafts of two sister taxa, the willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus, a migratory species with two annual moults, and the chiffchaff Phylloscopus collybita, a migrant with one annual post-nuptial moult. Juvenile and adult willow warbler and chiffchaff feathers, all grown on the breeding grounds, are structurally very similar to each other. Willow warbler feathers grown during moult on the wintering grounds, however, have a significantly higher second moment of area and a significantly larger cortex volume than all the other feather types. We discuss the possibility that the seasonal variability of willow warbler feathers may be an adaptive structural reflection of a moult-migration strategy that has allowed this species to occupy large breeding and wintering ranges.},
  author       = {Weber, Thomas and Kranenbarg, S. and Hedenström, Anders and Waarsing, J. H. and Weinans, H.},
  issn         = {0952-8369},
  keyword      = {chiffchaff,willow warbler,migration,moult,rachis,mu-CT imaging},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {163--170},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Zoology},
  title        = {Flight feather shaft structure of two warbler species with different moult schedules: a study using high-resolution X-ray imaging},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7998.2009.00644.x},
  volume       = {280},
  year         = {2010},
}