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Kin competition and the evolution of dispersal in an individual-based model

Bach, Lars LU ; Thomsen, R ; Pertoldi, C and Loeschcke, V (2006) In Ecological Modelling 192(3-4). p.658-666
Abstract
The evolution of dispersal was investigated in an adaptive individual-based metapopulation model, which allowed for demographic and environmental stochasticity. The individual dispersal behaviour was determined by a one-locus genotype subjected to simple inheritance and mutation. Dispersal behaviour could therefore evolve through the genotype–phenotype mapping and the selection regimes stemming from various ecological scenarios. Due to the individual-based design kin competition emerges per default rather than being approximated through an expected average level of relatedness. By decoupling reproduction and competition in the discrete life cycle dispersal was allowed to occur either before or after local competition. Hence, the degree to... (More)
The evolution of dispersal was investigated in an adaptive individual-based metapopulation model, which allowed for demographic and environmental stochasticity. The individual dispersal behaviour was determined by a one-locus genotype subjected to simple inheritance and mutation. Dispersal behaviour could therefore evolve through the genotype–phenotype mapping and the selection regimes stemming from various ecological scenarios. Due to the individual-based design kin competition emerges per default rather than being approximated through an expected average level of relatedness. By decoupling reproduction and competition in the discrete life cycle dispersal was allowed to occur either before or after local competition. Hence, the degree to which dispersal relaxed competition among siblings was investigated directly with respect to the effect on the evolved dispersal rate. We found a pronounced difference in the evolved level of dispersal for certain combinations of local extinction and dispersal cost. However, when either of these two evolutionary forces (local fluctuation in fitness or dispersal cost) predominates, the effect of kin selection seems to be overshadowed. The island and the stepping stone structures gave somewhat similar patterns of adaptive response suggesting some robustness to spatial effects, although, as expected, the effect was less pronounced with nearest neighbour dispersal in the stepping stone model. The results demonstrate under different stochastic and spatial scenarios how the evolution of dispersal alleviates kin competition when it originates from the population renewal process as an emergent property. Moreover, predictions are suggested that may be addressed by selection experiments. (Less)
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author
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Ecological Modelling
volume
192
issue
3-4
pages
658 - 666
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000235666300020
  • scopus:31944450559
ISSN
0304-3800
DOI
10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2005.07.026
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Theoretical ecology (Closed 2011) (011006011)
id
9358f037-ab30-4559-9948-6d6e674977ef (old id 155234)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 16:36:45
date last changed
2021-08-25 05:04:45
@article{9358f037-ab30-4559-9948-6d6e674977ef,
  abstract     = {The evolution of dispersal was investigated in an adaptive individual-based metapopulation model, which allowed for demographic and environmental stochasticity. The individual dispersal behaviour was determined by a one-locus genotype subjected to simple inheritance and mutation. Dispersal behaviour could therefore evolve through the genotype–phenotype mapping and the selection regimes stemming from various ecological scenarios. Due to the individual-based design kin competition emerges per default rather than being approximated through an expected average level of relatedness. By decoupling reproduction and competition in the discrete life cycle dispersal was allowed to occur either before or after local competition. Hence, the degree to which dispersal relaxed competition among siblings was investigated directly with respect to the effect on the evolved dispersal rate. We found a pronounced difference in the evolved level of dispersal for certain combinations of local extinction and dispersal cost. However, when either of these two evolutionary forces (local fluctuation in fitness or dispersal cost) predominates, the effect of kin selection seems to be overshadowed. The island and the stepping stone structures gave somewhat similar patterns of adaptive response suggesting some robustness to spatial effects, although, as expected, the effect was less pronounced with nearest neighbour dispersal in the stepping stone model. The results demonstrate under different stochastic and spatial scenarios how the evolution of dispersal alleviates kin competition when it originates from the population renewal process as an emergent property. Moreover, predictions are suggested that may be addressed by selection experiments.},
  author       = {Bach, Lars and Thomsen, R and Pertoldi, C and Loeschcke, V},
  issn         = {0304-3800},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3-4},
  pages        = {658--666},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Ecological Modelling},
  title        = {Kin competition and the evolution of dispersal in an individual-based model},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2005.07.026},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2005.07.026},
  volume       = {192},
  year         = {2006},
}