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Recovery and Buddhist Practices in the Aftermath of the Tsunami in Southern Thailand.

Lindberg Falk, Monica LU (2010) In Religion 40(2). p.96-103
Abstract
For most Thai people, Buddhism serves as a base for explanations about life and death.

This article focuses on Buddhist practices and the importance of ceremonies in the recovery process after

the 2004 tsunami in Southern Thailand. The tsunami had devastating consequences for most people in

the coastal regions. First, through the loss of life, and second, through the damage to and loss of houses,

fishing boats and means of livelihood. This article analyses informants’ experiences, narratives, interpretations

and actions in terms of their Buddhist beliefs. The key findings of this article are that collective

ceremonies form an important part of the recovery process. One finding revealed... (More)
For most Thai people, Buddhism serves as a base for explanations about life and death.

This article focuses on Buddhist practices and the importance of ceremonies in the recovery process after

the 2004 tsunami in Southern Thailand. The tsunami had devastating consequences for most people in

the coastal regions. First, through the loss of life, and second, through the damage to and loss of houses,

fishing boats and means of livelihood. This article analyses informants’ experiences, narratives, interpretations

and actions in terms of their Buddhist beliefs. The key findings of this article are that collective

ceremonies form an important part of the recovery process. One finding revealed that, in cases of

ambiguous loss, a Buddhist ceremony that was unknown to most people before the tsunami became an

important element of the search for missing persons. Another finding is that the common Buddhist

practice of communicating across the boundary between the living and dead became the most important

ritual among the surviving relatives. The ethnography is based on a long-term anthropological research

project with in-depth interviews, life stories and participant observation carried out in coastal villages

located mainly in Phang Nga, the worst hit province in Thailand (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Anthropology Buddhism Ceremonies Death Disaster Funerals Recovery Thailand Tsunami
in
Religion
volume
40
issue
2
pages
96 - 103
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000276619600003
  • scopus:77649292144
ISSN
0048-721X
DOI
10.1016/j.religion.2009.12.002
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6e37fc89-59a8-4b01-924b-c89db5b7c3e8 (old id 1580586)
date added to LUP
2010-03-30 12:12:40
date last changed
2018-05-29 12:02:45
@article{6e37fc89-59a8-4b01-924b-c89db5b7c3e8,
  abstract     = {For most Thai people, Buddhism serves as a base for explanations about life and death.<br/><br>
This article focuses on Buddhist practices and the importance of ceremonies in the recovery process after<br/><br>
the 2004 tsunami in Southern Thailand. The tsunami had devastating consequences for most people in<br/><br>
the coastal regions. First, through the loss of life, and second, through the damage to and loss of houses,<br/><br>
fishing boats and means of livelihood. This article analyses informants’ experiences, narratives, interpretations<br/><br>
and actions in terms of their Buddhist beliefs. The key findings of this article are that collective<br/><br>
ceremonies form an important part of the recovery process. One finding revealed that, in cases of<br/><br>
ambiguous loss, a Buddhist ceremony that was unknown to most people before the tsunami became an<br/><br>
important element of the search for missing persons. Another finding is that the common Buddhist<br/><br>
practice of communicating across the boundary between the living and dead became the most important<br/><br>
ritual among the surviving relatives. The ethnography is based on a long-term anthropological research<br/><br>
project with in-depth interviews, life stories and participant observation carried out in coastal villages<br/><br>
located mainly in Phang Nga, the worst hit province in Thailand},
  author       = {Lindberg Falk, Monica},
  issn         = {0048-721X},
  keyword      = {Anthropology Buddhism Ceremonies Death Disaster Funerals Recovery Thailand Tsunami},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {96--103},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Religion},
  title        = {Recovery and Buddhist Practices in the Aftermath of the Tsunami in Southern Thailand.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.religion.2009.12.002},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2010},
}