Advanced

A 1-year follow-up after shortened constraint-induced movement therapy with and without mitt poststroke.

Brogårdh, Christina LU and Lexell, Jan LU (2010) In Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 91(3). p.460-464
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To explore the long-term benefits of shortened constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in the subacute phase poststroke. DESIGN: A 1-year follow-up after shortened CIMT (3h training/d for 2 wk) where the participants had been randomized to a mitt group or a nonmitt group. SETTING: A university hospital rehabilitation department. PARTICIPANTS: Poststroke patients (N=20, 15 men, 5 women; mean age 58.8 y; on average 14.8 mo poststroke) with mild to moderate impairments of hand function. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The Sollerman hand function test, the modified Motor Assessment Scale, and the Motor Activity Log test. Assessments were made by blinded observers. RESULTS: One year after shortened CIMT,... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To explore the long-term benefits of shortened constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in the subacute phase poststroke. DESIGN: A 1-year follow-up after shortened CIMT (3h training/d for 2 wk) where the participants had been randomized to a mitt group or a nonmitt group. SETTING: A university hospital rehabilitation department. PARTICIPANTS: Poststroke patients (N=20, 15 men, 5 women; mean age 58.8 y; on average 14.8 mo poststroke) with mild to moderate impairments of hand function. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The Sollerman hand function test, the modified Motor Assessment Scale, and the Motor Activity Log test. Assessments were made by blinded observers. RESULTS: One year after shortened CIMT, participants within both the mitt group and the nonmitt group showed statistically significant improvements in arm and hand motor performance and on self-reported motor ability compared with before and after treatment. No significant differences between the groups were found in any measure at any time. CONCLUSIONS: Shortened CIMT seems to be beneficial up to 1 year after training, but the restraint may not enhance upper motor function. To determine which components of CIMT are most effective, larger randomized studies are needed. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Continuous Passive: methods, Motion Therapy, Arm: physiopathology, Hand: physiopathology, Stroke: rehabilitation
in
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
volume
91
issue
3
pages
460 - 464
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000277417900021
  • pmid:20298840
  • scopus:77949291124
ISSN
0003-9993
DOI
10.1016/j.apmr.2009.11.009
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b4ab603c-59e8-4958-a430-a1179a63c22c (old id 1581876)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20298840?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-04-08 09:09:36
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:49:13
@article{b4ab603c-59e8-4958-a430-a1179a63c22c,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To explore the long-term benefits of shortened constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in the subacute phase poststroke. DESIGN: A 1-year follow-up after shortened CIMT (3h training/d for 2 wk) where the participants had been randomized to a mitt group or a nonmitt group. SETTING: A university hospital rehabilitation department. PARTICIPANTS: Poststroke patients (N=20, 15 men, 5 women; mean age 58.8 y; on average 14.8 mo poststroke) with mild to moderate impairments of hand function. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The Sollerman hand function test, the modified Motor Assessment Scale, and the Motor Activity Log test. Assessments were made by blinded observers. RESULTS: One year after shortened CIMT, participants within both the mitt group and the nonmitt group showed statistically significant improvements in arm and hand motor performance and on self-reported motor ability compared with before and after treatment. No significant differences between the groups were found in any measure at any time. CONCLUSIONS: Shortened CIMT seems to be beneficial up to 1 year after training, but the restraint may not enhance upper motor function. To determine which components of CIMT are most effective, larger randomized studies are needed.},
  author       = {Brogårdh, Christina and Lexell, Jan},
  issn         = {0003-9993},
  keyword      = {Continuous Passive: methods,Motion Therapy,Arm: physiopathology,Hand: physiopathology,Stroke: rehabilitation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {460--464},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation},
  title        = {A 1-year follow-up after shortened constraint-induced movement therapy with and without mitt poststroke.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2009.11.009},
  volume       = {91},
  year         = {2010},
}