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Prevalence of osteoporosis and incidence of hip fracture in women--secular trends over 30 years.

Ahlborg, Henrik LU ; Rosengren, Björn LU ; Järvinen, Teppo L N; Rogmark, Cecilia LU ; Nilsson, Jan-Åke LU ; Sernbo, Ingemar LU and Karlsson, Magnus LU (2010) In BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 11.
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The number of hip fractures during recent decades has been reported to be increasing, partly because of an increasing proportion of elderly women in the society. However, whether changes in hip fracture annual incidence in women are attributable to secular changes in the prevalence of osteoporosis is unclear. METHODS: Bone mineral density was evaluated by single-photon absorptiometry at the distal radius in 456 women aged 50 years or above and living in the same city. The measurements were obtained by the same densitometer during three separate time periods: 1970-74 (n = 106), 1987-93 (n = 175) and 1998-1999 (n = 178), and the age-adjusted prevalence of osteoporosis in these three cohorts was calculated. Additionally, all hip... (More)
BACKGROUND: The number of hip fractures during recent decades has been reported to be increasing, partly because of an increasing proportion of elderly women in the society. However, whether changes in hip fracture annual incidence in women are attributable to secular changes in the prevalence of osteoporosis is unclear. METHODS: Bone mineral density was evaluated by single-photon absorptiometry at the distal radius in 456 women aged 50 years or above and living in the same city. The measurements were obtained by the same densitometer during three separate time periods: 1970-74 (n = 106), 1987-93 (n = 175) and 1998-1999 (n = 178), and the age-adjusted prevalence of osteoporosis in these three cohorts was calculated. Additionally, all hip fractures sustained in the target population of women aged 50 years or above between 1967 and 2001 were registered, whereupon the crude and the age-adjusted annual incidence of hip fractures were calculated. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the age-adjusted prevalence of osteoporosis when the three cohorts were compared (P = 1.00). The crude annual incidence (per 10,000 women) of hip fracture in the target population increased by 110% from 40 in 1967 to 84 in 2001. The overall trend in the crude incidence between 1967 and 2001 was increasing (1.58 per 10,000 women per year; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.17 to 1.99), whereas the age-adjusted incidence was stable over the same period (0.22 per 10,000 women per year; 95 percent confidence interval, -0.16 to 0.60). CONCLUSIONS: The increased number of hip fracture in elderly women is more likely to be attributable to demographic changes in the population than to secular increase in the prevalence of osteoporosis. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
volume
11
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000275878500001
  • pmid:20222965
  • scopus:77949481129
ISSN
1471-2474
DOI
10.1186/1471-2474-11-48
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
60e4788f-7bd5-4d46-9b1a-831cdd7737f6 (old id 1582262)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20222965?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-04-07 15:30:39
date last changed
2017-04-23 04:39:17
@article{60e4788f-7bd5-4d46-9b1a-831cdd7737f6,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: The number of hip fractures during recent decades has been reported to be increasing, partly because of an increasing proportion of elderly women in the society. However, whether changes in hip fracture annual incidence in women are attributable to secular changes in the prevalence of osteoporosis is unclear. METHODS: Bone mineral density was evaluated by single-photon absorptiometry at the distal radius in 456 women aged 50 years or above and living in the same city. The measurements were obtained by the same densitometer during three separate time periods: 1970-74 (n = 106), 1987-93 (n = 175) and 1998-1999 (n = 178), and the age-adjusted prevalence of osteoporosis in these three cohorts was calculated. Additionally, all hip fractures sustained in the target population of women aged 50 years or above between 1967 and 2001 were registered, whereupon the crude and the age-adjusted annual incidence of hip fractures were calculated. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the age-adjusted prevalence of osteoporosis when the three cohorts were compared (P = 1.00). The crude annual incidence (per 10,000 women) of hip fracture in the target population increased by 110% from 40 in 1967 to 84 in 2001. The overall trend in the crude incidence between 1967 and 2001 was increasing (1.58 per 10,000 women per year; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.17 to 1.99), whereas the age-adjusted incidence was stable over the same period (0.22 per 10,000 women per year; 95 percent confidence interval, -0.16 to 0.60). CONCLUSIONS: The increased number of hip fracture in elderly women is more likely to be attributable to demographic changes in the population than to secular increase in the prevalence of osteoporosis.},
  articleno    = {48},
  author       = {Ahlborg, Henrik and Rosengren, Björn and Järvinen, Teppo L N and Rogmark, Cecilia and Nilsson, Jan-Åke and Sernbo, Ingemar and Karlsson, Magnus},
  issn         = {1471-2474},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders},
  title        = {Prevalence of osteoporosis and incidence of hip fracture in women--secular trends over 30 years.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2474-11-48},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2010},
}