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Autonomic nervous dysfunction development in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome: a follow-up study.

Mandl, Thomas LU ; Hammar, Oskar LU ; Theander, Elke LU ; Wollmer, Per LU and Ohlsson, Bodil LU (2010) In Rheumatology (Oxford, England) Apr 7. p.1101-1106
Abstract
Objectives. To investigate autonomic dysfunction (AD) development in patients with primary SS (pSS) and the associations between AD and clinical, inflammatory and serological features of pSS. Methods. Twenty-seven patients with pSS, who had previously been evaluated for AD, were included in the study. The patients were studied at baseline and at follow-up by objective autonomic reflex tests (ARTs) and by the autonomic symptom profile (ASP) questionnaire, evaluating AD symptoms. The median follow-up time was 5 years for the ART and 4 years for the ASP variables. The results were compared with previously investigated healthy ART controls and population-based ASP controls. Fatigue, anxiety and depression were assessed by the profile of... (More)
Objectives. To investigate autonomic dysfunction (AD) development in patients with primary SS (pSS) and the associations between AD and clinical, inflammatory and serological features of pSS. Methods. Twenty-seven patients with pSS, who had previously been evaluated for AD, were included in the study. The patients were studied at baseline and at follow-up by objective autonomic reflex tests (ARTs) and by the autonomic symptom profile (ASP) questionnaire, evaluating AD symptoms. The median follow-up time was 5 years for the ART and 4 years for the ASP variables. The results were compared with previously investigated healthy ART controls and population-based ASP controls. Fatigue, anxiety and depression were assessed by the profile of fatigue and by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale. Results. Three of five ART variables as well as the ASP total score were significantly abnormal both at baseline and at follow-up in pSS patients in comparison with controls. When comparing ART and ASP results in pSS patients between baseline and follow-up, only the lowest diastolic blood pressure (lDBP) ratio significantly deteriorated during the follow-up period. The ART and ASP variables were not significantly correlated. However, the ASP total score significantly correlated with measurements of fatigue, anxiety and depression. Conclusions. Both objective signs and subjective symptoms of parasympathetic and sympathetic dysfunction were seen in pSS patients, both at baseline and at follow-up. During follow-up, only the lDBP ratio was found to significantly deteriorate. AD symptoms were significantly associated with fatigue, anxiety and depression. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Rheumatology (Oxford, England)
volume
Apr 7
pages
1101 - 1106
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000277731700012
  • pmid:20219783
  • scopus:77953529876
ISSN
1462-0332
DOI
10.1093/rheumatology/keq042
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f2e80e22-19c7-402c-b6ce-cdd5da877156 (old id 1582340)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20219783?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-04-07 16:23:44
date last changed
2017-01-29 04:19:19
@article{f2e80e22-19c7-402c-b6ce-cdd5da877156,
  abstract     = {Objectives. To investigate autonomic dysfunction (AD) development in patients with primary SS (pSS) and the associations between AD and clinical, inflammatory and serological features of pSS. Methods. Twenty-seven patients with pSS, who had previously been evaluated for AD, were included in the study. The patients were studied at baseline and at follow-up by objective autonomic reflex tests (ARTs) and by the autonomic symptom profile (ASP) questionnaire, evaluating AD symptoms. The median follow-up time was 5 years for the ART and 4 years for the ASP variables. The results were compared with previously investigated healthy ART controls and population-based ASP controls. Fatigue, anxiety and depression were assessed by the profile of fatigue and by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale. Results. Three of five ART variables as well as the ASP total score were significantly abnormal both at baseline and at follow-up in pSS patients in comparison with controls. When comparing ART and ASP results in pSS patients between baseline and follow-up, only the lowest diastolic blood pressure (lDBP) ratio significantly deteriorated during the follow-up period. The ART and ASP variables were not significantly correlated. However, the ASP total score significantly correlated with measurements of fatigue, anxiety and depression. Conclusions. Both objective signs and subjective symptoms of parasympathetic and sympathetic dysfunction were seen in pSS patients, both at baseline and at follow-up. During follow-up, only the lDBP ratio was found to significantly deteriorate. AD symptoms were significantly associated with fatigue, anxiety and depression.},
  author       = {Mandl, Thomas and Hammar, Oskar and Theander, Elke and Wollmer, Per and Ohlsson, Bodil},
  issn         = {1462-0332},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1101--1106},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Rheumatology (Oxford, England)},
  title        = {Autonomic nervous dysfunction development in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome: a follow-up study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/keq042},
  volume       = {Apr 7},
  year         = {2010},
}