Advanced

S100B Profiles and Cognitive Function at High Altitude

Bjursten, Henrik LU ; Ederoth, Per LU ; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Syk, Ingvar LU ; Einarsson, Orri and Gudbjartsson, Tomas (2010) In High Altitude Medicine & Biology 11(1). p.31-38
Abstract
Bjursten, Henrik, Per Ederoth, Engilbert Sigurdsson, Magnus Gottfredsson, Ingvar Syk, Orri Einarsson, and Tomas Gudbjartsson. S100B profiles and cognitive function at high altitude. High Alt. Med. Biol. 11:31-38, 2010.-Exposure to high altitude can lead to acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). In this study we investigated the effect of high altitude on neurocognitive function and S100B release. Increased S100B release has been hypothesized to signify a loss of integrity in the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Seven healthy volunteers trekked to Capanna Regina Margherita (4554 m above sea level) in the Monte Rosa massif. During ascent and descent, five test events were undertaken; participants underwent... (More)
Bjursten, Henrik, Per Ederoth, Engilbert Sigurdsson, Magnus Gottfredsson, Ingvar Syk, Orri Einarsson, and Tomas Gudbjartsson. S100B profiles and cognitive function at high altitude. High Alt. Med. Biol. 11:31-38, 2010.-Exposure to high altitude can lead to acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). In this study we investigated the effect of high altitude on neurocognitive function and S100B release. Increased S100B release has been hypothesized to signify a loss of integrity in the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Seven healthy volunteers trekked to Capanna Regina Margherita (4554 m above sea level) in the Monte Rosa massif. During ascent and descent, five test events were undertaken; participants underwent neurocognitive testing, Lake Louise scoring (LLS), and blood sampling to measure levels of S100B. The blood tests revealed that S100B levels increased 42% to 122% from baseline, and mean LLS increased from 0.57 to 2.57. A significant correlation was observed between both S100B levels and LLS and S100B and some neurocognitive scores. The study indicates that S100B can be released by a mild hypoxia during AMS. Moreover, an observed correlation between S100B and a lower score on neurocognitive tests suggests that the pathogenetic mechanisms may be linked. The study indicates that a decline in cognitive function is associated with symptoms of AMS. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
neurocognitive function, S100B, blood-brain barrier (BBB), high altitude cerebral edema (HACE), acute mountain sickness (AMS)
in
High Altitude Medicine & Biology
volume
11
issue
1
pages
31 - 38
publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000276172100005
  • scopus:77954729568
ISSN
1527-0297
DOI
10.1089/ham.2009.1041
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
35d307e9-15f9-43b3-b40e-ef120dfbb6b9 (old id 1587055)
date added to LUP
2010-04-27 09:59:27
date last changed
2018-07-22 03:13:05
@article{35d307e9-15f9-43b3-b40e-ef120dfbb6b9,
  abstract     = {Bjursten, Henrik, Per Ederoth, Engilbert Sigurdsson, Magnus Gottfredsson, Ingvar Syk, Orri Einarsson, and Tomas Gudbjartsson. S100B profiles and cognitive function at high altitude. High Alt. Med. Biol. 11:31-38, 2010.-Exposure to high altitude can lead to acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). In this study we investigated the effect of high altitude on neurocognitive function and S100B release. Increased S100B release has been hypothesized to signify a loss of integrity in the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Seven healthy volunteers trekked to Capanna Regina Margherita (4554 m above sea level) in the Monte Rosa massif. During ascent and descent, five test events were undertaken; participants underwent neurocognitive testing, Lake Louise scoring (LLS), and blood sampling to measure levels of S100B. The blood tests revealed that S100B levels increased 42% to 122% from baseline, and mean LLS increased from 0.57 to 2.57. A significant correlation was observed between both S100B levels and LLS and S100B and some neurocognitive scores. The study indicates that S100B can be released by a mild hypoxia during AMS. Moreover, an observed correlation between S100B and a lower score on neurocognitive tests suggests that the pathogenetic mechanisms may be linked. The study indicates that a decline in cognitive function is associated with symptoms of AMS.},
  author       = {Bjursten, Henrik and Ederoth, Per and Sigurdsson, Engilbert and Gottfredsson, Magnus and Syk, Ingvar and Einarsson, Orri and Gudbjartsson, Tomas},
  issn         = {1527-0297},
  keyword      = {neurocognitive function,S100B,blood-brain barrier (BBB),high altitude cerebral edema (HACE),acute mountain sickness (AMS)},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {31--38},
  publisher    = {Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.},
  series       = {High Altitude Medicine & Biology},
  title        = {S100B Profiles and Cognitive Function at High Altitude},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ham.2009.1041},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2010},
}