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Minimal Contribution of Fasting Hyperglycemia to the Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in Subjects With Normal 2-h Plasma Glucose

Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A.; Stern, Michael P.; Lyssenko, Valeriya LU ; Tuomi, Tiinamaija LU ; Groop, Leif LU and DeFronz, Ralph (2010) In Diabetes Care 33(3). p.557-561
Abstract
OBJECTIVE - To assess the relative contribution of increased fasting and postload plasma glucose concentrations to the incidence of type 2 diabetes in subjects with a normal 2-h plasma glucose concentration. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A total of 3,450 subjects with 2-h plasma glucose concentration < 140 mg/dl at baseline were followed up in the San Antonio Heart Study (SAHS) and the Botnia Study for 7-8 years. The incidence of type 2 diabetes at follow-up was related to the fasting, 1-h, and 2-h plasma glucose concentrations. RESULTS - in subjects with 2-h plasma glucose < 140 mg/dl, the incidence of type 2 diabetes increased with increasing fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 1-h and 2-h plasma glucose concentrations. In a... (More)
OBJECTIVE - To assess the relative contribution of increased fasting and postload plasma glucose concentrations to the incidence of type 2 diabetes in subjects with a normal 2-h plasma glucose concentration. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A total of 3,450 subjects with 2-h plasma glucose concentration < 140 mg/dl at baseline were followed up in the San Antonio Heart Study (SAHS) and the Botnia Study for 7-8 years. The incidence of type 2 diabetes at follow-up was related to the fasting, 1-h, and 2-h plasma glucose concentrations. RESULTS - in subjects with 2-h plasma glucose < 140 mg/dl, the incidence of type 2 diabetes increased with increasing fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 1-h and 2-h plasma glucose concentrations. In a multivariate logistic analysis, after adjustment for all diabetes risk factors, the FPG concentration was a Strong predictor Of type 2 diabetes in both the SAHS and the Botnia Study (P < 0.0001). However, when the 1-h plasma glucose, but not 2-h plasma glucose, concentration was added to the model, FPG concentration was no longer a significant predictor of type 2 diabetes in both Studies (NS). When subjects were matched for the level of 1-h plasma glucose concentration, the incidence Of type 2 diabetes markedly increased with the increase in 1-h plasma glucose, but the increase in FPG was not associated with a significant increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS - An increase in postload glycemia in the normal range is associated with an increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes. After controlling for 1-h plasma glucose concentration, the increase in FPG concentration is not associated with an increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diabetes Care
volume
33
issue
3
pages
557 - 561
publisher
American Diabetes Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000275562700020
  • scopus:77649255628
ISSN
1935-5548
DOI
10.2337/dc09-1145
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3f60b1ca-54e2-4f06-83b4-e930c052f0d0 (old id 1589074)
date added to LUP
2010-04-20 14:37:33
date last changed
2018-07-15 03:46:38
@article{3f60b1ca-54e2-4f06-83b4-e930c052f0d0,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE - To assess the relative contribution of increased fasting and postload plasma glucose concentrations to the incidence of type 2 diabetes in subjects with a normal 2-h plasma glucose concentration. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - A total of 3,450 subjects with 2-h plasma glucose concentration &lt; 140 mg/dl at baseline were followed up in the San Antonio Heart Study (SAHS) and the Botnia Study for 7-8 years. The incidence of type 2 diabetes at follow-up was related to the fasting, 1-h, and 2-h plasma glucose concentrations. RESULTS - in subjects with 2-h plasma glucose &lt; 140 mg/dl, the incidence of type 2 diabetes increased with increasing fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 1-h and 2-h plasma glucose concentrations. In a multivariate logistic analysis, after adjustment for all diabetes risk factors, the FPG concentration was a Strong predictor Of type 2 diabetes in both the SAHS and the Botnia Study (P &lt; 0.0001). However, when the 1-h plasma glucose, but not 2-h plasma glucose, concentration was added to the model, FPG concentration was no longer a significant predictor of type 2 diabetes in both Studies (NS). When subjects were matched for the level of 1-h plasma glucose concentration, the incidence Of type 2 diabetes markedly increased with the increase in 1-h plasma glucose, but the increase in FPG was not associated with a significant increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS - An increase in postload glycemia in the normal range is associated with an increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes. After controlling for 1-h plasma glucose concentration, the increase in FPG concentration is not associated with an increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes.},
  author       = {Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A. and Stern, Michael P. and Lyssenko, Valeriya and Tuomi, Tiinamaija and Groop, Leif and DeFronz, Ralph},
  issn         = {1935-5548},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {557--561},
  publisher    = {American Diabetes Association},
  series       = {Diabetes Care},
  title        = {Minimal Contribution of Fasting Hyperglycemia to the Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in Subjects With Normal 2-h Plasma Glucose},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc09-1145},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2010},
}