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Neurophysiologic recovery after carpal tunnel release in diabetic patients.

Thomsen, Niels LU ; Rosén, Ingmar LU and Dahlin, Lars LU (2010) In Clinical Neurophysiology May 4. p.1569-1573
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare nerve conduction study results, before and after surgical carpal tunnel release, in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. METHODS: In a prospective study (2004-2007), we included 35 consecutive diabetic patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), who were age and gender matched with 31 non-diabetic patients having idiopathic CTS. Preoperatively, and at the 1year follow-up, nerve conduction studies were performed of the median and ulnar nerve. Presence of neuropathy was based on abnormal preoperative neurophysiologic values in both the sural and the peroneal nerve. RESULTS: Diabetic patients demonstrated significantly impaired nerve conduction parameters, before as well as after surgical carpal tunnel release, compared... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To compare nerve conduction study results, before and after surgical carpal tunnel release, in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. METHODS: In a prospective study (2004-2007), we included 35 consecutive diabetic patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), who were age and gender matched with 31 non-diabetic patients having idiopathic CTS. Preoperatively, and at the 1year follow-up, nerve conduction studies were performed of the median and ulnar nerve. Presence of neuropathy was based on abnormal preoperative neurophysiologic values in both the sural and the peroneal nerve. RESULTS: Diabetic patients demonstrated significantly impaired nerve conduction parameters, before as well as after surgical carpal tunnel release, compared to non-diabetic patients. However, neurophysiologic recovery after carpal tunnel release was not different between the two patient groups or between diabetic patients with or without peripheral neuropathy. In general, the largest neurophysiologic recovery was demonstrated for parameters with the greatest impairment, but normal values were seldom reached. CONCLUSIONS: Marked neurophysiologic impairment of the median nerve, or signs of peripheral neuropathy, does not preclude significant recovery after carpal tunnel release in diabetic patients. SIGNIFICANCE: Diabetic patients with CTS should be offered the same opportunities for surgical carpal tunnel release as non-diabetic patients. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Clinical Neurophysiology
volume
May 4
pages
1569 - 1573
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000280555400021
  • pmid:20413347
  • scopus:77955267492
ISSN
1872-8952
DOI
10.1016/j.clinph.2010.03.014
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
477ba5fc-401a-4456-bd17-d5e421996923 (old id 1594869)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20413347?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-05-04 21:39:20
date last changed
2018-06-03 04:29:57
@article{477ba5fc-401a-4456-bd17-d5e421996923,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To compare nerve conduction study results, before and after surgical carpal tunnel release, in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. METHODS: In a prospective study (2004-2007), we included 35 consecutive diabetic patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), who were age and gender matched with 31 non-diabetic patients having idiopathic CTS. Preoperatively, and at the 1year follow-up, nerve conduction studies were performed of the median and ulnar nerve. Presence of neuropathy was based on abnormal preoperative neurophysiologic values in both the sural and the peroneal nerve. RESULTS: Diabetic patients demonstrated significantly impaired nerve conduction parameters, before as well as after surgical carpal tunnel release, compared to non-diabetic patients. However, neurophysiologic recovery after carpal tunnel release was not different between the two patient groups or between diabetic patients with or without peripheral neuropathy. In general, the largest neurophysiologic recovery was demonstrated for parameters with the greatest impairment, but normal values were seldom reached. CONCLUSIONS: Marked neurophysiologic impairment of the median nerve, or signs of peripheral neuropathy, does not preclude significant recovery after carpal tunnel release in diabetic patients. SIGNIFICANCE: Diabetic patients with CTS should be offered the same opportunities for surgical carpal tunnel release as non-diabetic patients.},
  author       = {Thomsen, Niels and Rosén, Ingmar and Dahlin, Lars},
  issn         = {1872-8952},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1569--1573},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Clinical Neurophysiology},
  title        = {Neurophysiologic recovery after carpal tunnel release in diabetic patients.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2010.03.014},
  volume       = {May 4},
  year         = {2010},
}