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Importance of neonatal immunoglobulin transfer for hippocampal development and behaviour in the newborn pig

Goncharova, Kateryna LU ; Lozinska, Liudmyla LU ; Sureda, Ester Arevalo LU ; Woliński, Jarosław; Weström, Björn LU and Pierzynowski, Stefan LU (2017) In PLoS ONE 12(6).
Abstract

Neurological disorders are among the main clinical problems affecting preterm children and often result in the development of communication and learning disabilities later in life. Several factors are of importance for brain development, however the role of immunoglobulins (passive immunity transfer) has not yet been investigated. Piglets are born agammaglobulinemic, as a result of the lack of transfer of maternal immunoglobulins in utero, thus, they serve as an ideal model to mimic the condition of immunoglobulin deficiency in preterm infants. Thirty six, unsuckled newborn piglets were fed an infant formula or colostrum and supplemented orally or intravenously with either species-specific or foreign immunoglobulin and then compared to... (More)

Neurological disorders are among the main clinical problems affecting preterm children and often result in the development of communication and learning disabilities later in life. Several factors are of importance for brain development, however the role of immunoglobulins (passive immunity transfer) has not yet been investigated. Piglets are born agammaglobulinemic, as a result of the lack of transfer of maternal immunoglobulins in utero, thus, they serve as an ideal model to mimic the condition of immunoglobulin deficiency in preterm infants. Thirty six, unsuckled newborn piglets were fed an infant formula or colostrum and supplemented orally or intravenously with either species-specific or foreign immunoglobulin and then compared to both newborn and sow-reared piglets. Two days after the piglets were born behavioural tests (novel recognition and olfactory discrimination of conspecifics scent) were performed, after which the piglets were sacrificed and blood, cerebrospinal fluid and hippocampi samples were collected for analyses. Both parameters of neuronal plasticity (neuronal maturation and synapse-associated proteins) and behavioural test parameters appeared to be improved by the appearance of species-specific porcine immunoglulin in the circulation and cerebrospinal fluid of the piglets. In conclusion, we postulate possible positive clinical effects following intravenous infusion of human immunoglobulin in terms of neuronal plasticity and cognitive function in preterm infants born with low blood immunoglobulin levels.

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author
organization
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type
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publication status
published
subject
in
PLoS ONE
volume
12
issue
6
publisher
Public Library of Science
external identifiers
  • scopus:85021658396
  • wos:000404607900051
ISSN
1932-6203
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0180002
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
15f8a612-4183-40e1-89e9-343232be4de8
date added to LUP
2017-08-30 09:28:08
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:16:32
@article{15f8a612-4183-40e1-89e9-343232be4de8,
  abstract     = {<p>Neurological disorders are among the main clinical problems affecting preterm children and often result in the development of communication and learning disabilities later in life. Several factors are of importance for brain development, however the role of immunoglobulins (passive immunity transfer) has not yet been investigated. Piglets are born agammaglobulinemic, as a result of the lack of transfer of maternal immunoglobulins in utero, thus, they serve as an ideal model to mimic the condition of immunoglobulin deficiency in preterm infants. Thirty six, unsuckled newborn piglets were fed an infant formula or colostrum and supplemented orally or intravenously with either species-specific or foreign immunoglobulin and then compared to both newborn and sow-reared piglets. Two days after the piglets were born behavioural tests (novel recognition and olfactory discrimination of conspecifics scent) were performed, after which the piglets were sacrificed and blood, cerebrospinal fluid and hippocampi samples were collected for analyses. Both parameters of neuronal plasticity (neuronal maturation and synapse-associated proteins) and behavioural test parameters appeared to be improved by the appearance of species-specific porcine immunoglulin in the circulation and cerebrospinal fluid of the piglets. In conclusion, we postulate possible positive clinical effects following intravenous infusion of human immunoglobulin in terms of neuronal plasticity and cognitive function in preterm infants born with low blood immunoglobulin levels.</p>},
  articleno    = {e0180002},
  author       = {Goncharova, Kateryna and Lozinska, Liudmyla and Sureda, Ester Arevalo and Woliński, Jarosław and Weström, Björn and Pierzynowski, Stefan},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  number       = {6},
  publisher    = {Public Library of Science},
  series       = {PLoS ONE},
  title        = {Importance of neonatal immunoglobulin transfer for hippocampal development and behaviour in the newborn pig},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0180002},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2017},
}