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Evaluation of plasma A beta(40) and A beta(42) as predictors of conversion to Alzheimer's disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment

Hansson, Oskar LU ; Zetterberg, Henrik; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Andreasson, Ulf; Londos, Elisabet LU ; Wallin, Anders; Minthon, Lennart LU and Blennow, Kaj (2010) In Neurobiology of Aging 31(3). p.357-367
Abstract
Numerous studies have shown a marked decrease of beta-amyloid(42) (A beta(42)) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with incipient Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, studies on A beta in plasma are contradictory, and show very marginal differences between patients and controls. Here, we analyzed plasma samples using a new multiplex immunoassay for simultaneous analysis of A beta(1-40), A beta(n-40), A beta(1-42), and A beta(n-42). The plasma samples were obtained at baseline from two independent cohorts of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and age-matched controls. In the first cohort, 41% of the 117 MCI cases converted to AD during a clinical follow-up period of 4-7 years. In the second cohort, 14% of the 110 MCI... (More)
Numerous studies have shown a marked decrease of beta-amyloid(42) (A beta(42)) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with incipient Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, studies on A beta in plasma are contradictory, and show very marginal differences between patients and controls. Here, we analyzed plasma samples using a new multiplex immunoassay for simultaneous analysis of A beta(1-40), A beta(n-40), A beta(1-42), and A beta(n-42). The plasma samples were obtained at baseline from two independent cohorts of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and age-matched controls. In the first cohort, 41% of the 117 MCI cases converted to AD during a clinical follow-up period of 4-7 years. In the second cohort, 14% of the 110 MCI subjects developed AD during a clinical follow-up period of 2-4 years. None of the plasma A beta isoforms differed between MCI patients that subsequently developed AD and healthy controls or stable MCI patients. The Cox proportional hazards model did not reveal any differences in the probability of progression from MCI to AD related to plasma A beta levels. In contrast, low levels of A beta(1-42) in CSF were strongly associated with increased risk of future AD. The absence of a change in plasma A beta in incipient AD, despite the marked change in CSF, may be explained by the lack of a correlation between the levels of A beta(1-42) in CSF and plasma. In conclusion, the results show that CSF biomarkers are better predictors of progression to AD than plasma A beta isoforms. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Plasma, Biomarkers, Mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, Cerebrospinal fluid, Beta-amyloid
in
Neurobiology of Aging
volume
31
issue
3
pages
357 - 367
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000276759600001
  • scopus:74149089257
ISSN
1558-1497
DOI
10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2008.03.027
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b3ca61c9-088c-47ad-96c1-6105447bffd9 (old id 1602564)
date added to LUP
2010-05-19 10:25:23
date last changed
2018-07-01 03:08:14
@article{b3ca61c9-088c-47ad-96c1-6105447bffd9,
  abstract     = {Numerous studies have shown a marked decrease of beta-amyloid(42) (A beta(42)) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with incipient Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, studies on A beta in plasma are contradictory, and show very marginal differences between patients and controls. Here, we analyzed plasma samples using a new multiplex immunoassay for simultaneous analysis of A beta(1-40), A beta(n-40), A beta(1-42), and A beta(n-42). The plasma samples were obtained at baseline from two independent cohorts of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and age-matched controls. In the first cohort, 41% of the 117 MCI cases converted to AD during a clinical follow-up period of 4-7 years. In the second cohort, 14% of the 110 MCI subjects developed AD during a clinical follow-up period of 2-4 years. None of the plasma A beta isoforms differed between MCI patients that subsequently developed AD and healthy controls or stable MCI patients. The Cox proportional hazards model did not reveal any differences in the probability of progression from MCI to AD related to plasma A beta levels. In contrast, low levels of A beta(1-42) in CSF were strongly associated with increased risk of future AD. The absence of a change in plasma A beta in incipient AD, despite the marked change in CSF, may be explained by the lack of a correlation between the levels of A beta(1-42) in CSF and plasma. In conclusion, the results show that CSF biomarkers are better predictors of progression to AD than plasma A beta isoforms. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Hansson, Oskar and Zetterberg, Henrik and Vanmechelen, Eugeen and Vanderstichele, Hugo and Andreasson, Ulf and Londos, Elisabet and Wallin, Anders and Minthon, Lennart and Blennow, Kaj},
  issn         = {1558-1497},
  keyword      = {Plasma,Biomarkers,Mild cognitive impairment,Alzheimer's disease,Cerebrospinal fluid,Beta-amyloid},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {357--367},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Neurobiology of Aging},
  title        = {Evaluation of plasma A beta(40) and A beta(42) as predictors of conversion to Alzheimer's disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2008.03.027},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2010},
}