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Health-related quality of life in diabetic patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

Thomsen, Niels LU ; Cederlund, Ragnhild LU ; Bjork, J. and Dahlin, Lars LU (2010) In Diabetic Medicine 27(4). p.466-472
Abstract
P>Aims To determine health-related quality of life (HRQL) in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) before and after surgical treatment. Methods In a prospective study, 35 consecutive diabetic patients with CTS were age and gender matched with 31 non-diabetic patients with idiopathic CTS. At baseline (preoperatively), 6, 12 and 52 weeks after surgical carpal tunnel release, patients completed the generic Short-Form 36 (SF-36) and the disease-specific Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ). Results The SF-36 physical component scores at baseline were significantly reduced for diabetic (39 +/- 7.4) compared with non-diabetic patients (48 +/- 9.0) (P < 0.05). Mixed model analysis demonstrated no... (More)
P>Aims To determine health-related quality of life (HRQL) in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) before and after surgical treatment. Methods In a prospective study, 35 consecutive diabetic patients with CTS were age and gender matched with 31 non-diabetic patients with idiopathic CTS. At baseline (preoperatively), 6, 12 and 52 weeks after surgical carpal tunnel release, patients completed the generic Short-Form 36 (SF-36) and the disease-specific Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ). Results The SF-36 physical component scores at baseline were significantly reduced for diabetic (39 +/- 7.4) compared with non-diabetic patients (48 +/- 9.0) (P < 0.05). Mixed model analysis demonstrated no differences in post-surgical improvement over time between diabetic and non-diabetic patients. The largest clinical effect was found for bodily pain (effect size 0.8). However, population norms were not reached for the diabetic patients. At baseline, no difference was found in mental component score, which deteriorated over time for diabetic patients. At baseline, BCTQ demonstrated that diabetic patients experienced more pronounced 'numbness in the hand' than non-diabetic patients. Large clinical improvements were found in both symptom severity (effect size 1.98-2.14) and functional status score (effect size 0.89-0.94) for both diabetic and non-diabetic patients, with no difference between the two patient groups. Conclusions HRQL is impaired in diabetic patients with CTS compared with non-diabetic patients with CTS and population norms. However, diabetic patients experience similar symptomatic and functional benefits from carpal tunnel release as do non-diabetic patients. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Short, Form 36, health-related quality of life, carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetes
in
Diabetic Medicine
volume
27
issue
4
pages
466 - 472
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000276466600015
  • pmid:20536520
  • scopus:77950678630
ISSN
1464-5491
DOI
10.1111/j.1464-5491.2010.02970.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c29ede95-ea11-4ab0-a392-b1690684bb16 (old id 1603940)
date added to LUP
2010-05-18 15:59:49
date last changed
2018-06-03 04:00:55
@article{c29ede95-ea11-4ab0-a392-b1690684bb16,
  abstract     = {P&gt;Aims To determine health-related quality of life (HRQL) in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) before and after surgical treatment. Methods In a prospective study, 35 consecutive diabetic patients with CTS were age and gender matched with 31 non-diabetic patients with idiopathic CTS. At baseline (preoperatively), 6, 12 and 52 weeks after surgical carpal tunnel release, patients completed the generic Short-Form 36 (SF-36) and the disease-specific Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ). Results The SF-36 physical component scores at baseline were significantly reduced for diabetic (39 +/- 7.4) compared with non-diabetic patients (48 +/- 9.0) (P &lt; 0.05). Mixed model analysis demonstrated no differences in post-surgical improvement over time between diabetic and non-diabetic patients. The largest clinical effect was found for bodily pain (effect size 0.8). However, population norms were not reached for the diabetic patients. At baseline, no difference was found in mental component score, which deteriorated over time for diabetic patients. At baseline, BCTQ demonstrated that diabetic patients experienced more pronounced 'numbness in the hand' than non-diabetic patients. Large clinical improvements were found in both symptom severity (effect size 1.98-2.14) and functional status score (effect size 0.89-0.94) for both diabetic and non-diabetic patients, with no difference between the two patient groups. Conclusions HRQL is impaired in diabetic patients with CTS compared with non-diabetic patients with CTS and population norms. However, diabetic patients experience similar symptomatic and functional benefits from carpal tunnel release as do non-diabetic patients.},
  author       = {Thomsen, Niels and Cederlund, Ragnhild and Bjork, J. and Dahlin, Lars},
  issn         = {1464-5491},
  keyword      = {Short,Form 36,health-related quality of life,carpal tunnel syndrome,diabetes},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {466--472},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Diabetic Medicine},
  title        = {Health-related quality of life in diabetic patients with carpal tunnel syndrome},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-5491.2010.02970.x},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2010},
}