Advanced

Congo red and protein aggregation in neurodegenerative diseases

Frid, Petrea LU ; Anisimov, Sergey V LU and Popovic, Natalija LU (2007) In Brain Research Reviews 53(1). p.60-135
Abstract

Congo red is a commonly used histological dye for amyloid detection. The specificity of this staining results from Congo red's affinity for binding to fibril proteins enriched in beta-sheet conformation. Unexpectedly, recent investigations indicate that the dye also possesses the capacity to interfere with processes of protein misfolding and aggregation, stabilizing native protein monomers or partially folded intermediates, while reducing concentration of more toxic protein oligomers. Inhibitory effects of Congo red upon amyloid toxicity may also range from blockade of channel formation and interference with glycosaminoglycans binding or immune functions, to the modulation of gene expression. Particularly, Congo red exhibits... (More)

Congo red is a commonly used histological dye for amyloid detection. The specificity of this staining results from Congo red's affinity for binding to fibril proteins enriched in beta-sheet conformation. Unexpectedly, recent investigations indicate that the dye also possesses the capacity to interfere with processes of protein misfolding and aggregation, stabilizing native protein monomers or partially folded intermediates, while reducing concentration of more toxic protein oligomers. Inhibitory effects of Congo red upon amyloid toxicity may also range from blockade of channel formation and interference with glycosaminoglycans binding or immune functions, to the modulation of gene expression. Particularly, Congo red exhibits ameliorative effect in models of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and prion diseases. Another interesting application of Congo red analogues is the development of imaging probes. Based on their small molecular size and penetrability through blood-brain barrier, Congo red congeners can be used for both antemortem and in vivo visualization and quantification of brain amyloids. Therefore, understanding mechanisms involved in dye-amyloidal fibril binding and inhibition of aggregation will provide instructive guides for the design of future compounds, potentially useful for monitoring and treating neurodegenerative diseases.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Amyloid beta-Peptides, Animals, Coloring Agents, Congo Red, Humans, Inclusion Bodies, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Neuroprotective Agents, Plaque, Amyloid, Protein Folding, Staining and Labeling, Journal Article, Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Review
in
Brain Research Reviews
volume
53
issue
1
pages
26 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000243221600009
  • scopus:33845192482
ISSN
1872-6321
DOI
10.1016/j.brainresrev.2006.08.001
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fff15997-7563-45d2-a678-4da54a57f243 (old id 161139)
date added to LUP
2007-07-12 11:35:52
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:47:36
@article{fff15997-7563-45d2-a678-4da54a57f243,
  abstract     = {<p>Congo red is a commonly used histological dye for amyloid detection. The specificity of this staining results from Congo red's affinity for binding to fibril proteins enriched in beta-sheet conformation. Unexpectedly, recent investigations indicate that the dye also possesses the capacity to interfere with processes of protein misfolding and aggregation, stabilizing native protein monomers or partially folded intermediates, while reducing concentration of more toxic protein oligomers. Inhibitory effects of Congo red upon amyloid toxicity may also range from blockade of channel formation and interference with glycosaminoglycans binding or immune functions, to the modulation of gene expression. Particularly, Congo red exhibits ameliorative effect in models of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and prion diseases. Another interesting application of Congo red analogues is the development of imaging probes. Based on their small molecular size and penetrability through blood-brain barrier, Congo red congeners can be used for both antemortem and in vivo visualization and quantification of brain amyloids. Therefore, understanding mechanisms involved in dye-amyloidal fibril binding and inhibition of aggregation will provide instructive guides for the design of future compounds, potentially useful for monitoring and treating neurodegenerative diseases.</p>},
  author       = {Frid, Petrea and Anisimov, Sergey V and Popovic, Natalija},
  issn         = {1872-6321},
  keyword      = {Amyloid beta-Peptides,Animals,Coloring Agents,Congo Red,Humans,Inclusion Bodies,Neurodegenerative Diseases,Neuroprotective Agents,Plaque, Amyloid,Protein Folding,Staining and Labeling,Journal Article,Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural,Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't,Review},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {60--135},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Brain Research Reviews},
  title        = {Congo red and protein aggregation in neurodegenerative diseases},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainresrev.2006.08.001},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2007},
}