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The Development of a Systemic School-Based Intervention: Marte Meo and Coordination Meetings

Axberg, Ulf ; Hansson, Kjell LU ; Broberg, Anders G. and Wirtberg, Ingegerd LU (2006) In Family Process 45(3). p.375-389
Abstract
Antisocial behavior is often persistent, and in addition to causing suffering to children and their families, it also poses considerable costs for society. Children who display externalizing behavior in their early years run a high risk of having severe problems later in life. There is a need for treatment methods that may be used in various settings because these children constitute a group that is hard to reach with conventional treatment methods. In addition, the dropout rate from ordinary treatment is often high. In the present study, a systemic school-based model for early detection and intervention among 4–12-year-old children who displayed externalizing behavior problems was developed and examined in a nonrandomized study in the... (More)
Antisocial behavior is often persistent, and in addition to causing suffering to children and their families, it also poses considerable costs for society. Children who display externalizing behavior in their early years run a high risk of having severe problems later in life. There is a need for treatment methods that may be used in various settings because these children constitute a group that is hard to reach with conventional treatment methods. In addition, the dropout rate from ordinary treatment is often high. In the present study, a systemic school-based model for early detection and intervention among 4–12-year-old children who displayed externalizing behavior problems was developed and examined in a nonrandomized study in the county of Skaraborg in Sweden. The intervention was collaborative and included a combination of the Marte Meo model and coordination meetings based on systemic theory and practice. Treatment effects in the group who had received the intervention were compared with a group who had received treatment as usual in their ordinary school setting. Assessments were carried out before, and 2 years after, the intervention. For the intervention group (N=33), there was a significant decrease in the children's reported symptoms in school and in the home. No decrease in externalizing behavior was found in the comparison group (N=16). There were no dropouts in the intervention group after the intervention had begun. The results are promising; the study demonstrates that it is possible to work effectively with many children who display externalizing behavior problems in a nonclinical setting. (Less)
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author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Family Process
volume
45
issue
3
pages
375 - 389
publisher
Family Process
external identifiers
  • pmid:16984077
  • wos:000239704200009
  • scopus:33747192012
ISSN
0014-7370
DOI
10.1111/j.1545-5300.2006.00177.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
20c9aeba-b727-4f3f-a879-cad4aca47e4c (old id 161631)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 15:56:09
date last changed
2021-10-06 04:32:57
@article{20c9aeba-b727-4f3f-a879-cad4aca47e4c,
  abstract     = {Antisocial behavior is often persistent, and in addition to causing suffering to children and their families, it also poses considerable costs for society. Children who display externalizing behavior in their early years run a high risk of having severe problems later in life. There is a need for treatment methods that may be used in various settings because these children constitute a group that is hard to reach with conventional treatment methods. In addition, the dropout rate from ordinary treatment is often high. In the present study, a systemic school-based model for early detection and intervention among 4–12-year-old children who displayed externalizing behavior problems was developed and examined in a nonrandomized study in the county of Skaraborg in Sweden. The intervention was collaborative and included a combination of the Marte Meo model and coordination meetings based on systemic theory and practice. Treatment effects in the group who had received the intervention were compared with a group who had received treatment as usual in their ordinary school setting. Assessments were carried out before, and 2 years after, the intervention. For the intervention group (N=33), there was a significant decrease in the children's reported symptoms in school and in the home. No decrease in externalizing behavior was found in the comparison group (N=16). There were no dropouts in the intervention group after the intervention had begun. The results are promising; the study demonstrates that it is possible to work effectively with many children who display externalizing behavior problems in a nonclinical setting.},
  author       = {Axberg, Ulf and Hansson, Kjell and Broberg, Anders G. and Wirtberg, Ingegerd},
  issn         = {0014-7370},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {375--389},
  publisher    = {Family Process},
  series       = {Family Process},
  title        = {The Development of a Systemic School-Based Intervention: Marte Meo and Coordination Meetings},
  url          = {https://lup.lub.lu.se/search/files/4518158/625626.pdf},
  doi          = {10.1111/j.1545-5300.2006.00177.x},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2006},
}