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Can we tell what we said when we hear ourselves saying something else? - Real-time speech manipulation as a new instrument for the testing of verbal intentions and self monitoring

Lind, Andreas LU ; Hall, Lars LU ; Johansson, Petter LU and Sikström, Sverker LU (2009) In Studies in Language and Cognition p.62-75
Abstract
It is commonly assumed that speech production is initiated and guided by clear pre-verbal intentions. These intentions are moreover supposed to function as a standard of accuracy against which actual performance can be measured. Alternative positions to such a centrally governed process have been offered, but very few empirical attempts have been made to explore the issue. We aimed to remedy this by investigating the role of auditory feedback of one‘s own voice in the understanding of the meaning of self-produced speech. Participants performed a computerized Stroop test while hearing their own voice exclusively through earphones, and we covertly recorded three of their utterances. These words were then played back to the participants over... (More)
It is commonly assumed that speech production is initiated and guided by clear pre-verbal intentions. These intentions are moreover supposed to function as a standard of accuracy against which actual performance can be measured. Alternative positions to such a centrally governed process have been offered, but very few empirical attempts have been made to explore the issue. We aimed to remedy this by investigating the role of auditory feedback of one‘s own voice in the understanding of the meaning of self-produced speech. Participants performed a computerized Stroop test while hearing their own voice exclusively through earphones, and we covertly recorded three of their utterances. These words were then played back to the participants over the headphones while they were engaged in a different trial of the test, effectively creating a situation where the participants heard themselves saying something other than what they actually said (i.e. we exchanged what they said for something they had said earlier). The results showed that such manipulations were almost always retrospectively detected, but that a majority of the participants reported that they had experienced significant confusion as to the actual source of the manipulated feedback, and not being certain if it was produced by themselves or not. In addition, on a minority of manipulated trials, participants acted towards the manipulated feedback as if it was self-produced. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
Studies in Language and Cognition
editor
Zlatev, Jordan; Andrén, Mats; Johansson Falck, Marlene; Lundmark, Carita; ; ; and
pages
62 - 75
publisher
Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN
(13): 978-1-4438-0174-4
(10): 1-4438-0174-7
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
1c5957a7-2e94-4cbf-8add-84cd54c0b282 (old id 1625508)
date added to LUP
2010-07-01 14:01:41
date last changed
2016-06-29 09:00:46
@inbook{1c5957a7-2e94-4cbf-8add-84cd54c0b282,
  abstract     = {It is commonly assumed that speech production is initiated and guided by clear pre-verbal intentions. These intentions are moreover supposed to function as a standard of accuracy against which actual performance can be measured. Alternative positions to such a centrally governed process have been offered, but very few empirical attempts have been made to explore the issue. We aimed to remedy this by investigating the role of auditory feedback of one‘s own voice in the understanding of the meaning of self-produced speech. Participants performed a computerized Stroop test while hearing their own voice exclusively through earphones, and we covertly recorded three of their utterances. These words were then played back to the participants over the headphones while they were engaged in a different trial of the test, effectively creating a situation where the participants heard themselves saying something other than what they actually said (i.e. we exchanged what they said for something they had said earlier). The results showed that such manipulations were almost always retrospectively detected, but that a majority of the participants reported that they had experienced significant confusion as to the actual source of the manipulated feedback, and not being certain if it was produced by themselves or not. In addition, on a minority of manipulated trials, participants acted towards the manipulated feedback as if it was self-produced.},
  author       = {Lind, Andreas and Hall, Lars and Johansson, Petter and Sikström, Sverker},
  editor       = {Zlatev, Jordan and Andrén, Mats and Johansson Falck, Marlene and Lundmark, Carita},
  isbn         = {(13): 978-1-4438-0174-4},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {62--75},
  publisher    = {Cambridge Scholars Publishing},
  series       = {Studies in Language and Cognition},
  title        = {Can we tell what we said when we hear ourselves saying something else? - Real-time speech manipulation as a new instrument for the testing of verbal intentions and self monitoring},
  year         = {2009},
}