Advanced

Preterm birth and psychiatric medication prescription in young adulthood: a Swedish national cohort study.

Crump, Casey; Winkleby, Marilyn LU ; Sundquist, Kristina LU and Sundquist, Jan LU (2010) In International Journal of Epidemiology Jul 1. p.1522-1530
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest an increased risk of adverse mental health outcomes among young adults who were born preterm. These studies have been based mainly on hospital data, thus missing large numbers of mental health problems that do not require inpatient treatment. We used national outpatient and inpatient pharmacy data to evaluate whether individuals who were born preterm were more likely to be prescribed psychiatric medications during young adulthood than individuals who were born full term. METHODS: A national cohort of all infants born in Sweden from 1973 through 1979 [N = 635 933, including 28 799 who were born preterm (<37 weeks)] was followed to ages 25.5-34.0 years to determine whether psychotropic medications... (More)
BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest an increased risk of adverse mental health outcomes among young adults who were born preterm. These studies have been based mainly on hospital data, thus missing large numbers of mental health problems that do not require inpatient treatment. We used national outpatient and inpatient pharmacy data to evaluate whether individuals who were born preterm were more likely to be prescribed psychiatric medications during young adulthood than individuals who were born full term. METHODS: A national cohort of all infants born in Sweden from 1973 through 1979 [N = 635 933, including 28 799 who were born preterm (<37 weeks)] was followed to ages 25.5-34.0 years to determine whether psychotropic medications (antidepressants, antipsychotics, anxiolytics, hypnotics/sedatives and/or psychostimulants) were prescribed in 2005-06. RESULTS: A trend of increasing rate of prescriptions for antipsychotics, antidepressants and hypnotics/sedatives in young adulthood was observed by earlier gestational age at birth. Young adults who were extremely preterm at birth (23-27 weeks) were 3.1 times more likely to be prescribed antipsychotics [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.66-5.93], 1.8 times more likely to be prescribed antidepressants (95% CI 1.26-2.64) and 1.8 times more likely to be prescribed hypnotics/sedatives (95% CI 1.15-2.96) than individuals who were full term at birth, after adjusting for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: This national cohort study, using outpatient and inpatient pharmacy data, suggests that preterm birth has important independent effects on mental health that extend at least into young adulthood. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Journal of Epidemiology
volume
Jul 1
pages
1522 - 1530
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000284952700020
  • pmid:20570995
  • scopus:78649796059
ISSN
1464-3685
DOI
10.1093/ije/dyq103
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f3b828b7-6e51-461b-9bf6-91ce362ca144 (old id 1625797)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20570995?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-07-05 21:35:35
date last changed
2018-06-03 04:32:10
@article{f3b828b7-6e51-461b-9bf6-91ce362ca144,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest an increased risk of adverse mental health outcomes among young adults who were born preterm. These studies have been based mainly on hospital data, thus missing large numbers of mental health problems that do not require inpatient treatment. We used national outpatient and inpatient pharmacy data to evaluate whether individuals who were born preterm were more likely to be prescribed psychiatric medications during young adulthood than individuals who were born full term. METHODS: A national cohort of all infants born in Sweden from 1973 through 1979 [N = 635 933, including 28 799 who were born preterm (&lt;37 weeks)] was followed to ages 25.5-34.0 years to determine whether psychotropic medications (antidepressants, antipsychotics, anxiolytics, hypnotics/sedatives and/or psychostimulants) were prescribed in 2005-06. RESULTS: A trend of increasing rate of prescriptions for antipsychotics, antidepressants and hypnotics/sedatives in young adulthood was observed by earlier gestational age at birth. Young adults who were extremely preterm at birth (23-27 weeks) were 3.1 times more likely to be prescribed antipsychotics [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.66-5.93], 1.8 times more likely to be prescribed antidepressants (95% CI 1.26-2.64) and 1.8 times more likely to be prescribed hypnotics/sedatives (95% CI 1.15-2.96) than individuals who were full term at birth, after adjusting for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: This national cohort study, using outpatient and inpatient pharmacy data, suggests that preterm birth has important independent effects on mental health that extend at least into young adulthood.},
  author       = {Crump, Casey and Winkleby, Marilyn and Sundquist, Kristina and Sundquist, Jan},
  issn         = {1464-3685},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1522--1530},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {International Journal of Epidemiology},
  title        = {Preterm birth and psychiatric medication prescription in young adulthood: a Swedish national cohort study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyq103},
  volume       = {Jul 1},
  year         = {2010},
}