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How many trials are needed to achieve performance stability of the Timed Up & Go test in patients with hip fracture?

Tange Kristensen, Morten LU ; Ekdahl, Charlotte LU ; Kehlet, Henrik and Bandholm, Thomas (2010) In Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 91(6). p.885-889
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:

To examine the number of trials needed to achieve performance stability of the Timed Up & Go (TUG) test using a standardized walking aid in patients with hip fracture who are allowed full weight bearing (FWB).



DESIGN:

Prospective methodologic study.



SETTING:

An acute 14-bed orthopedic hip fracture unit.



PARTICIPANTS:

Patients (N=122; 89 women, 33 men) with hip fracture with a median age (25%-75%, quartiles) of 80 (67-85) years performed the TUG on hospital discharge to their own home (n=115) or further inpatient rehabilitation (n=7).



INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.



MAIN OUTCOME... (More)
OBJECTIVE:

To examine the number of trials needed to achieve performance stability of the Timed Up & Go (TUG) test using a standardized walking aid in patients with hip fracture who are allowed full weight bearing (FWB).



DESIGN:

Prospective methodologic study.



SETTING:

An acute 14-bed orthopedic hip fracture unit.



PARTICIPANTS:

Patients (N=122; 89 women, 33 men) with hip fracture with a median age (25%-75%, quartiles) of 80 (67-85) years performed the TUG on hospital discharge to their own home (n=115) or further inpatient rehabilitation (n=7).



INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.



MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

After a demonstration by a physical therapist how to perform the TUG with a standardized walking aid (a 4-wheeled rollator), the patients performed 6 timed TUG trials with up to 1-minute seated rest intervals. The participants were given a few minutes to familiarize with the rollator before commencing the timed trials. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni corrections were used to examine the number of trials needed to ensure statistically stable TUG scores.



RESULTS:

A total of 106 (87%) patients performed all 6 TUG trials, while 120 patients performed a minimum of 3 timed trials. Repeated-measures ANOVAs of both groups showed that TUG scores improved significantly (P< or =.007) up to and including the third TUG trial.



CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that the original TUG manual, described as 1 practice trial followed by 1 timed trial, needs modification when used in patients with hip fracture who are allowed FWB. The best (fastest) of 3 timed TUG trials performed with a standardized walking aid is recommended. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
volume
91
issue
6
pages
885 - 889
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000278755800009
  • pmid:20510979
  • scopus:77952683224
ISSN
0003-9993
DOI
10.1016/j.apmr.2010.01.021
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
edcca7c6-4fe7-47cf-9b99-3f13c6986142 (old id 1626537)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20510979?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-07-01 22:19:42
date last changed
2018-06-10 04:48:34
@article{edcca7c6-4fe7-47cf-9b99-3f13c6986142,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: <br/><br>
To examine the number of trials needed to achieve performance stability of the Timed Up &amp; Go (TUG) test using a standardized walking aid in patients with hip fracture who are allowed full weight bearing (FWB). <br/><br>
<br/><br>
DESIGN: <br/><br>
Prospective methodologic study. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
SETTING: <br/><br>
An acute 14-bed orthopedic hip fracture unit. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
PARTICIPANTS: <br/><br>
Patients (N=122; 89 women, 33 men) with hip fracture with a median age (25%-75%, quartiles) of 80 (67-85) years performed the TUG on hospital discharge to their own home (n=115) or further inpatient rehabilitation (n=7). <br/><br>
<br/><br>
INTERVENTIONS: <br/><br>
Not applicable. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: <br/><br>
After a demonstration by a physical therapist how to perform the TUG with a standardized walking aid (a 4-wheeled rollator), the patients performed 6 timed TUG trials with up to 1-minute seated rest intervals. The participants were given a few minutes to familiarize with the rollator before commencing the timed trials. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni corrections were used to examine the number of trials needed to ensure statistically stable TUG scores. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS: <br/><br>
A total of 106 (87%) patients performed all 6 TUG trials, while 120 patients performed a minimum of 3 timed trials. Repeated-measures ANOVAs of both groups showed that TUG scores improved significantly (P&lt; or =.007) up to and including the third TUG trial. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSIONS: <br/><br>
These results suggest that the original TUG manual, described as 1 practice trial followed by 1 timed trial, needs modification when used in patients with hip fracture who are allowed FWB. The best (fastest) of 3 timed TUG trials performed with a standardized walking aid is recommended.},
  author       = {Tange Kristensen, Morten and Ekdahl, Charlotte and Kehlet, Henrik and Bandholm, Thomas},
  issn         = {0003-9993},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {885--889},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation},
  title        = {How many trials are needed to achieve performance stability of the Timed Up & Go test in patients with hip fracture?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2010.01.021},
  volume       = {91},
  year         = {2010},
}