Skip to main content

Lund University Publications

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

COHb% as a marker of cardiovascular risk in never smokers: results from a population-based cohort study.

Hedblad, Bo LU ; Engström, Gunnar LU ; Janzon, Ellis LU ; Berglund, Göran LU and Janzon, Lars LU (2006) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 34(6). p.609-615
Abstract
Aim: Carbon monoxide (CO) in blood as assessed by the COHb% is a marker of the cardiovascular ( CV) risk in smokers. Non-smokers exposed to tobacco smoke similarly inhale and absorb CO. The objective in this population-based cohort study has been to describe inter-individual differences in COHb% in never smokers and to estimate the associated cardiovascular risk. Methods: Of the 8,333 men, aged 34-49 years, from the city of Malmo, Sweden, 4,111 were smokers, 1,229 ex-smokers, and 2,893 were never smokers. Incidence of CV disease was monitored over 19 years of follow up. Results: COHb% in never smokers ranged from 0.13% to 5.47%. Never smokers with COHb% in the top quartile (above 0.67%) had a significantly higher incidence of cardiac... (More)
Aim: Carbon monoxide (CO) in blood as assessed by the COHb% is a marker of the cardiovascular ( CV) risk in smokers. Non-smokers exposed to tobacco smoke similarly inhale and absorb CO. The objective in this population-based cohort study has been to describe inter-individual differences in COHb% in never smokers and to estimate the associated cardiovascular risk. Methods: Of the 8,333 men, aged 34-49 years, from the city of Malmo, Sweden, 4,111 were smokers, 1,229 ex-smokers, and 2,893 were never smokers. Incidence of CV disease was monitored over 19 years of follow up. Results: COHb% in never smokers ranged from 0.13% to 5.47%. Never smokers with COHb% in the top quartile (above 0.67%) had a significantly higher incidence of cardiac events and deaths; relative risk 3.7 (95% CI 2.0-7.0) and 2.2 (1.4-3.5), respectively, compared with those with COHb% in the lowest quartile (below 0.50%). This risk remained after adjustment for confounding factors. Conclusion: COHb% varied widely between never-smoking men in this urban population. Incidence of CV disease and death in non-smokers was related to COHb%. It is suggested that measurement of COHb% could be part of the risk assessment in non-smoking patients considered at risk of cardiac disease. In random samples from the general population COHb% could be used to assess the size of the population exposed to second-hand smoke. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
epidemiology, passive smoking, carbon monoxide, myocardial infarction
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
volume
34
issue
6
pages
609 - 615
publisher
SAGE Publications
external identifiers
  • wos:000242346600008
  • scopus:33751504831
ISSN
1651-1905
DOI
10.1080/14034940600590523
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f3683e61-8aba-4f7b-92e2-979a8362b895 (old id 164306)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17132594&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 16:05:59
date last changed
2021-02-17 05:20:18
@article{f3683e61-8aba-4f7b-92e2-979a8362b895,
  abstract     = {Aim: Carbon monoxide (CO) in blood as assessed by the COHb% is a marker of the cardiovascular ( CV) risk in smokers. Non-smokers exposed to tobacco smoke similarly inhale and absorb CO. The objective in this population-based cohort study has been to describe inter-individual differences in COHb% in never smokers and to estimate the associated cardiovascular risk. Methods: Of the 8,333 men, aged 34-49 years, from the city of Malmo, Sweden, 4,111 were smokers, 1,229 ex-smokers, and 2,893 were never smokers. Incidence of CV disease was monitored over 19 years of follow up. Results: COHb% in never smokers ranged from 0.13% to 5.47%. Never smokers with COHb% in the top quartile (above 0.67%) had a significantly higher incidence of cardiac events and deaths; relative risk 3.7 (95% CI 2.0-7.0) and 2.2 (1.4-3.5), respectively, compared with those with COHb% in the lowest quartile (below 0.50%). This risk remained after adjustment for confounding factors. Conclusion: COHb% varied widely between never-smoking men in this urban population. Incidence of CV disease and death in non-smokers was related to COHb%. It is suggested that measurement of COHb% could be part of the risk assessment in non-smoking patients considered at risk of cardiac disease. In random samples from the general population COHb% could be used to assess the size of the population exposed to second-hand smoke.},
  author       = {Hedblad, Bo and Engström, Gunnar and Janzon, Ellis and Berglund, Göran and Janzon, Lars},
  issn         = {1651-1905},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {609--615},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {COHb% as a marker of cardiovascular risk in never smokers: results from a population-based cohort study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14034940600590523},
  doi          = {10.1080/14034940600590523},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2006},
}