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The experience of Middle Eastern men living in Sweden of maternal and child health care and fatherhood: focus-group discussions and content analysis.

Ny, Pernilla LU ; Plantin, Lars; Dejin-Karlsson, Elisabeth and Dykes, Anna-Karin LU (2008) In Midwifery 24(3). p.281-290
Abstract
Objective



To describe how men from the Middle East experience Swedish maternity and child health care. An integral part of the aim of this study has also been to describe the experiences of men from the Middle East when becoming and being a father in Sweden.



Design, setting and participants



an exploratory, qualitative study using focus-group discussions and individual interviews, with a semi-structured interview guide and content analysis. A total of 16 men participated. Ten Arabic-speaking men from the Middle East living in Sweden participated in three focus-group discussions. Six men from the Middle East living in Sweden, and speaking Swedish, participated in individual... (More)
Objective



To describe how men from the Middle East experience Swedish maternity and child health care. An integral part of the aim of this study has also been to describe the experiences of men from the Middle East when becoming and being a father in Sweden.



Design, setting and participants



an exploratory, qualitative study using focus-group discussions and individual interviews, with a semi-structured interview guide and content analysis. A total of 16 men participated. Ten Arabic-speaking men from the Middle East living in Sweden participated in three focus-group discussions. Six men from the Middle East living in Sweden, and speaking Swedish, participated in individual interviews.



Findings



three main categories were developed: meeting empathic professionals; finding new positions within the family; and experiencing social demands.



Key conclusions and implications for practice



seeing their partners being met individually and with empathy by midwives and child health-care nurses encouraged men to become involved in areas not previously open to them (i.e. pregnancy, childbirth and the care of babies and young children). As the women often lacked knowledge of Swedish, they depended on the help of their partners when meeting maternity and child health-care professionals. The men found the experience of living in an alien country difficult. They were often unemployed, felt they were a burden to their wives after emigrating to Sweden, and that they were no longer a suitable role model for their children. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Fathers, Maternal health care, Emigration and immigration, Child health services
in
Midwifery
volume
24
issue
3
pages
281 - 290
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000259052200005
  • scopus:48549101898
ISSN
1532-3099
DOI
10.1016/j.midw.2006.05.006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7fdfb119-a742-46bc-81d1-318a92b2a16c (old id 164365)
date added to LUP
2007-07-23 16:06:46
date last changed
2017-05-21 03:32:54
@article{7fdfb119-a742-46bc-81d1-318a92b2a16c,
  abstract     = {Objective<br/><br>
<br/><br>
To describe how men from the Middle East experience Swedish maternity and child health care. An integral part of the aim of this study has also been to describe the experiences of men from the Middle East when becoming and being a father in Sweden.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Design, setting and participants<br/><br>
<br/><br>
an exploratory, qualitative study using focus-group discussions and individual interviews, with a semi-structured interview guide and content analysis. A total of 16 men participated. Ten Arabic-speaking men from the Middle East living in Sweden participated in three focus-group discussions. Six men from the Middle East living in Sweden, and speaking Swedish, participated in individual interviews.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Findings<br/><br>
<br/><br>
three main categories were developed: meeting empathic professionals; finding new positions within the family; and experiencing social demands.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Key conclusions and implications for practice<br/><br>
<br/><br>
seeing their partners being met individually and with empathy by midwives and child health-care nurses encouraged men to become involved in areas not previously open to them (i.e. pregnancy, childbirth and the care of babies and young children). As the women often lacked knowledge of Swedish, they depended on the help of their partners when meeting maternity and child health-care professionals. The men found the experience of living in an alien country difficult. They were often unemployed, felt they were a burden to their wives after emigrating to Sweden, and that they were no longer a suitable role model for their children.},
  author       = {Ny, Pernilla and Plantin, Lars and Dejin-Karlsson, Elisabeth and Dykes, Anna-Karin},
  issn         = {1532-3099},
  keyword      = {Fathers,Maternal health care,Emigration and immigration,Child health services},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {281--290},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Midwifery},
  title        = {The experience of Middle Eastern men living in Sweden of maternal and child health care and fatherhood: focus-group discussions and content analysis.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.midw.2006.05.006},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2008},
}