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Clinical Factors Associated with Intracranial Complications after Pediatric Traumatic Head Injury: An Observational Study of Children Submitted to a Neurosurgical Referral Unit.

Åstrand, Ramona LU ; Undén, Johan; Hesselgard, Karin LU ; Reinstrup, Peter LU and Romner, Bertil LU (2010) In Pediatric Neurosurgery 46(2). p.101-109
Abstract
Background: Clinically validated guidelines for the management of head injury in children do not exist, and the treatment is often based upon adult management routines. In order to examine the safety of this procedure, an analysis of clinical factors associated with complications after pediatric head injury was attempted. Method: We performed a descriptive retrospective study, including patients who received any S06 diagnosis during treatment in the Neurointensive Care Unit at Lund University Hospital between 2002 and 2007. One hundred children were included during the 6 years. Results: During 6 years, 100 children with head injury needed neurointensive care or neurosurgery for their injury in southern Sweden. Traffic accidents (50%) were... (More)
Background: Clinically validated guidelines for the management of head injury in children do not exist, and the treatment is often based upon adult management routines. In order to examine the safety of this procedure, an analysis of clinical factors associated with complications after pediatric head injury was attempted. Method: We performed a descriptive retrospective study, including patients who received any S06 diagnosis during treatment in the Neurointensive Care Unit at Lund University Hospital between 2002 and 2007. One hundred children were included during the 6 years. Results: During 6 years, 100 children with head injury needed neurointensive care or neurosurgery for their injury in southern Sweden. Traffic accidents (50%) were the main cause of head trauma, followed by falls (36%). Thirty-two percent of all children were injured in bicycle and motorcycle accidents. Both loss of consciousness and amnesia were absent in 23% of the children with intracranial injury. Seven children with intracranial injury, 6 of them requiring neurosurgery, were classed as having minimal head injury according to the Head Injury Severity Scale (HISS). Interesting differences in intracranial injuries between helmet users and nonusers were observed. Conclusion: Children with minimal head injuries (according to HISS) may develop intracranial complications and may even require neurosurgical intervention. Hence, the HISS classification, as well as other risk classifications based upon unconsciousness and amnesia, are unreliable in children. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Pediatric Neurosurgery
volume
46
issue
2
pages
101 - 109
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • WOS:000280683500003
  • PMID:20664236
  • Scopus:77954671742
ISSN
1016-2291
DOI
10.1159/000319006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
653eb372-9d0a-4529-a57f-2608573f7972 (old id 1644512)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20664236?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-08-05 11:06:01
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:48:56
@article{653eb372-9d0a-4529-a57f-2608573f7972,
  abstract     = {Background: Clinically validated guidelines for the management of head injury in children do not exist, and the treatment is often based upon adult management routines. In order to examine the safety of this procedure, an analysis of clinical factors associated with complications after pediatric head injury was attempted. Method: We performed a descriptive retrospective study, including patients who received any S06 diagnosis during treatment in the Neurointensive Care Unit at Lund University Hospital between 2002 and 2007. One hundred children were included during the 6 years. Results: During 6 years, 100 children with head injury needed neurointensive care or neurosurgery for their injury in southern Sweden. Traffic accidents (50%) were the main cause of head trauma, followed by falls (36%). Thirty-two percent of all children were injured in bicycle and motorcycle accidents. Both loss of consciousness and amnesia were absent in 23% of the children with intracranial injury. Seven children with intracranial injury, 6 of them requiring neurosurgery, were classed as having minimal head injury according to the Head Injury Severity Scale (HISS). Interesting differences in intracranial injuries between helmet users and nonusers were observed. Conclusion: Children with minimal head injuries (according to HISS) may develop intracranial complications and may even require neurosurgical intervention. Hence, the HISS classification, as well as other risk classifications based upon unconsciousness and amnesia, are unreliable in children.},
  author       = {Åstrand, Ramona and Undén, Johan and Hesselgard, Karin and Reinstrup, Peter and Romner, Bertil},
  issn         = {1016-2291},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {101--109},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Pediatric Neurosurgery},
  title        = {Clinical Factors Associated with Intracranial Complications after Pediatric Traumatic Head Injury: An Observational Study of Children Submitted to a Neurosurgical Referral Unit.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000319006},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2010},
}