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The grade in physical education in adolescence as predictor for musculoskeletal pain diagnoses three decades later.

Timpka, Simon LU ; Petersson, Ingemar LU and Englund, Martin LU (2010) In Pain 150. p.414-419
Abstract
We hypothesized that a low grade in physical education (PE) is associated with an increased risk of future musculoskeletal conditions, especially chronic pain. Using a historical cohort study design, we identified all students (mean age 16.0years), who in 1974-1976 graduated from compulsory school in a Swedish municipality and retrieved their PE grades. We ensured that persons were still alive and resident in the county in 2003-2007 and linked data to the Skåne Health Care Register covering all in- and outpatient care in the county. Diagnoses in focus were soft tissue pain, back pain, and osteoarthritis registered as ICD-10 codes. We used a logistic regression model adjusted for education and occupation to investigate the associations... (More)
We hypothesized that a low grade in physical education (PE) is associated with an increased risk of future musculoskeletal conditions, especially chronic pain. Using a historical cohort study design, we identified all students (mean age 16.0years), who in 1974-1976 graduated from compulsory school in a Swedish municipality and retrieved their PE grades. We ensured that persons were still alive and resident in the county in 2003-2007 and linked data to the Skåne Health Care Register covering all in- and outpatient care in the county. Diagnoses in focus were soft tissue pain, back pain, and osteoarthritis registered as ICD-10 codes. We used a logistic regression model adjusted for education and occupation to investigate the associations between the PE grade and a future musculoskeletal diagnosis. An average grade served as reference group. Of 2298 graduates born 1957-1962, 1712 (74.5%) were resident in the county at follow-up. Women with a low (bad) PE grade had an increased odds ratio (OR) for a musculoskeletal diagnosis OR=1.5 (95% CI=1.0-2.2) as well as for the subgroup "Other soft tissue disorders, not elsewhere classified" (M79) OR=1.9 (95% CI=1.0-3.3), containing mostly chronic soft tissue pain disorders. In men with a high (good) PE grade, we found a decreased risk for "Soft tissue disorders" (M60-M79) OR=0.54 (95% CI=0.33-0.86) as well as for the subgroup "Other enthesopathies" (M77) OR=0.29 (95% CI=0.11-0.78). This study indicates that adolescent girls with a low PE grade could be an important group to target with early interventions to reduce future musculoskeletal illness. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Pain
volume
150
pages
414 - 419
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000281675000011
  • pmid:20650564
  • scopus:77955566467
ISSN
1872-6623
DOI
10.1016/j.pain.2010.03.035
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a75283bd-9748-4884-91e2-94324b9ffd65 (old id 1644638)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20650564?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-08-05 10:01:11
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:07:07
@article{a75283bd-9748-4884-91e2-94324b9ffd65,
  abstract     = {We hypothesized that a low grade in physical education (PE) is associated with an increased risk of future musculoskeletal conditions, especially chronic pain. Using a historical cohort study design, we identified all students (mean age 16.0years), who in 1974-1976 graduated from compulsory school in a Swedish municipality and retrieved their PE grades. We ensured that persons were still alive and resident in the county in 2003-2007 and linked data to the Skåne Health Care Register covering all in- and outpatient care in the county. Diagnoses in focus were soft tissue pain, back pain, and osteoarthritis registered as ICD-10 codes. We used a logistic regression model adjusted for education and occupation to investigate the associations between the PE grade and a future musculoskeletal diagnosis. An average grade served as reference group. Of 2298 graduates born 1957-1962, 1712 (74.5%) were resident in the county at follow-up. Women with a low (bad) PE grade had an increased odds ratio (OR) for a musculoskeletal diagnosis OR=1.5 (95% CI=1.0-2.2) as well as for the subgroup "Other soft tissue disorders, not elsewhere classified" (M79) OR=1.9 (95% CI=1.0-3.3), containing mostly chronic soft tissue pain disorders. In men with a high (good) PE grade, we found a decreased risk for "Soft tissue disorders" (M60-M79) OR=0.54 (95% CI=0.33-0.86) as well as for the subgroup "Other enthesopathies" (M77) OR=0.29 (95% CI=0.11-0.78). This study indicates that adolescent girls with a low PE grade could be an important group to target with early interventions to reduce future musculoskeletal illness.},
  author       = {Timpka, Simon and Petersson, Ingemar and Englund, Martin},
  issn         = {1872-6623},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {414--419},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Pain},
  title        = {The grade in physical education in adolescence as predictor for musculoskeletal pain diagnoses three decades later.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pain.2010.03.035},
  volume       = {150},
  year         = {2010},
}