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Poor self-rated health in adult patients with type 2 diabetes in the town of Södertälje: A cross-sectional study.

Taloyan, Marina; Wajngot, Alexandre; Johansson, Sven-Erik LU ; Tovi, Jonas and Sundquist, Jan LU (2010) In Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care 28. p.216-220
Abstract
Abstract Objective. Several studies indicate that ethnicity may be a strong predictor of poor self-rated health (SRH). The aims of the present study were to investigate whether there was an association between ethnicity and poor SRH in subjects with type 2 diabetes and to determine if the association remained after adjusting for possible confounders such as age, gender employment, marital status, and education. Design. A cross-sectional study based on a patient population in the town of Södertälje. An unconditional logistic regression was performed to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Setting. Four primary health care centers. Subjects. A total of 354 individuals were included: Assyrian/Syrian-born (n =... (More)
Abstract Objective. Several studies indicate that ethnicity may be a strong predictor of poor self-rated health (SRH). The aims of the present study were to investigate whether there was an association between ethnicity and poor SRH in subjects with type 2 diabetes and to determine if the association remained after adjusting for possible confounders such as age, gender employment, marital status, and education. Design. A cross-sectional study based on a patient population in the town of Södertälje. An unconditional logistic regression was performed to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Setting. Four primary health care centers. Subjects. A total of 354 individuals were included: Assyrian/Syrian-born (n = 173) and Swedish-born (n = 181). Results. The odds ratio for rating poor SRH for Assyrian/Syrian subjects with type 2 diabetes was 4.5 times higher (95% CI = 2.7-7.5) than for Swedish patients in a crude model. After adjusting for possible confounders, unemployed/retired people had 5.4 times higher odds for reporting poor SRH than employees (OR = 5.4; 95% CI = 2.3-12.5). Women had 1.8 times higher odds (95% CI = 1.0-3.0) for reporting poor SRH than men. In the final model poor SRH among Assyrians/Syrians decreased but still remained significant (OR=3.7; 95% CI = 2.5-6.6). Conclusions. The findings in this study are important for planning primary health care services. They highlight the crucial importance of being aware of the subjective health status of immigrants fleeing from war in the Middle East and resettling in Sweden. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care
volume
28
pages
216 - 220
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000284315900007
  • pmid:20608888
  • scopus:78649257334
ISSN
0281-3432
DOI
10.3109/00016349.2010.501223
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d683e864-5e9e-4a67-9e5b-5dd6ecfbf28e (old id 1645240)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20608888?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-08-02 10:22:21
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:34:17
@article{d683e864-5e9e-4a67-9e5b-5dd6ecfbf28e,
  abstract     = {Abstract Objective. Several studies indicate that ethnicity may be a strong predictor of poor self-rated health (SRH). The aims of the present study were to investigate whether there was an association between ethnicity and poor SRH in subjects with type 2 diabetes and to determine if the association remained after adjusting for possible confounders such as age, gender employment, marital status, and education. Design. A cross-sectional study based on a patient population in the town of Södertälje. An unconditional logistic regression was performed to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Setting. Four primary health care centers. Subjects. A total of 354 individuals were included: Assyrian/Syrian-born (n = 173) and Swedish-born (n = 181). Results. The odds ratio for rating poor SRH for Assyrian/Syrian subjects with type 2 diabetes was 4.5 times higher (95% CI = 2.7-7.5) than for Swedish patients in a crude model. After adjusting for possible confounders, unemployed/retired people had 5.4 times higher odds for reporting poor SRH than employees (OR = 5.4; 95% CI = 2.3-12.5). Women had 1.8 times higher odds (95% CI = 1.0-3.0) for reporting poor SRH than men. In the final model poor SRH among Assyrians/Syrians decreased but still remained significant (OR=3.7; 95% CI = 2.5-6.6). Conclusions. The findings in this study are important for planning primary health care services. They highlight the crucial importance of being aware of the subjective health status of immigrants fleeing from war in the Middle East and resettling in Sweden.},
  author       = {Taloyan, Marina and Wajngot, Alexandre and Johansson, Sven-Erik and Tovi, Jonas and Sundquist, Jan},
  issn         = {0281-3432},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {216--220},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care},
  title        = {Poor self-rated health in adult patients with type 2 diabetes in the town of Södertälje: A cross-sectional study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016349.2010.501223},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2010},
}