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Maternal use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors in early pregnancy and infant congenital malformations.

Källén, Bengt LU and Otterblad Olausson, Petra (2007) In Birth Defects Research. Clinical and Molecular Teratology 79(4). p.301-308
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Maternal use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has recently been associated with an increased risk for certain malformations. METHODS: Using the Swedish Medical Birth Register, we identified women who had reported the use of SSRIs in early pregnancy and studied their infants, born between July 1, 1995 and the end of 2004. Congenital malformations were identified from that register, from the Register of Congenital Malformations, and from the Hospital Discharge Register. The effect of drug exposure was studied after adjustment for a number of identified maternal characteristics that could act as confounders. RESULTS: We identified 6,481 women who reported the use of SSRIs in early pregnancy and their 6,555... (More)
BACKGROUND: Maternal use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has recently been associated with an increased risk for certain malformations. METHODS: Using the Swedish Medical Birth Register, we identified women who had reported the use of SSRIs in early pregnancy and studied their infants, born between July 1, 1995 and the end of 2004. Congenital malformations were identified from that register, from the Register of Congenital Malformations, and from the Hospital Discharge Register. The effect of drug exposure was studied after adjustment for a number of identified maternal characteristics that could act as confounders. RESULTS: We identified 6,481 women who reported the use of SSRIs in early pregnancy and their 6,555 infants. There was no general increase in malformation risk. An increased risk for cystic kidneys was seen, but this was based on only nine malformed infants, and the pathology varied between these cases. An in-depth study of cardiovascular defects identified an association between such defects and notably ventricular and atrial septum defects and maternal use of paroxetine but not other SSRls. No support for a postulated association between SSRI use and infant craniostenosis or omphalocele was found. CONCLUSIONS: Use of SSRIs in early pregnancy does not seem to be a major risk factor for infant malformations. The association between paroxetine use and infant cardiovascular defects may be a result of multiple testing, but is supported by other studies. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
paroxetine, congenital malformations, cardiovascular defects, SSRI drugs
in
Birth Defects Research. Clinical and Molecular Teratology
volume
79
issue
4
pages
301 - 308
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000245621600008
  • scopus:34250842467
ISSN
1542-0760
DOI
10.1002/bdra.20327
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5bcac876-2f21-473b-8089-a9224f900b4a (old id 164987)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17216624&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-23 12:58:00
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:43:31
@article{5bcac876-2f21-473b-8089-a9224f900b4a,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Maternal use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has recently been associated with an increased risk for certain malformations. METHODS: Using the Swedish Medical Birth Register, we identified women who had reported the use of SSRIs in early pregnancy and studied their infants, born between July 1, 1995 and the end of 2004. Congenital malformations were identified from that register, from the Register of Congenital Malformations, and from the Hospital Discharge Register. The effect of drug exposure was studied after adjustment for a number of identified maternal characteristics that could act as confounders. RESULTS: We identified 6,481 women who reported the use of SSRIs in early pregnancy and their 6,555 infants. There was no general increase in malformation risk. An increased risk for cystic kidneys was seen, but this was based on only nine malformed infants, and the pathology varied between these cases. An in-depth study of cardiovascular defects identified an association between such defects and notably ventricular and atrial septum defects and maternal use of paroxetine but not other SSRls. No support for a postulated association between SSRI use and infant craniostenosis or omphalocele was found. CONCLUSIONS: Use of SSRIs in early pregnancy does not seem to be a major risk factor for infant malformations. The association between paroxetine use and infant cardiovascular defects may be a result of multiple testing, but is supported by other studies.},
  author       = {Källén, Bengt and Otterblad Olausson, Petra},
  issn         = {1542-0760},
  keyword      = {paroxetine,congenital malformations,cardiovascular defects,SSRI drugs},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {301--308},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Birth Defects Research. Clinical and Molecular Teratology},
  title        = {Maternal use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors in early pregnancy and infant congenital malformations.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdra.20327},
  volume       = {79},
  year         = {2007},
}