Advanced

The pig as a model for premature infants - The importance of immunoglobulin supplementation for growth and development

Socha-Banasiak, A.; Pierzynowski, S. LU ; Woliński, J.; Grujic, D.; Boryczka, M.; Grzesiak, P.; Szczurek, P. LU ; Czkwianianc, E.; Westrom, B. LU and Goncharova, K. LU (2017) In Journal of Biological Regulators and Homeostatic Agents 31(1). p.87-92
Abstract

Preterm human neonates, contrary to preterm piglets, obtain immunoglobulins from their mothers via the placenta during intrauterine development. However, one should note that the majority of trans-placental transfer of immunoglobulins in humans takes place during the last trimester of pregnancy. It is also known that the feeding of limited amounts of colostrum or systemic infusion of small amounts of serum improves the survival of preterm and full-term piglets. Full-term piglets deprived of their mother's immunoglobulins exhibit strong apathy and develop watery diarrhoea, often resulting in death. The aim of the current study was to determine if provision of immunoglobulins using different approaches would be beneficial for survival... (More)

Preterm human neonates, contrary to preterm piglets, obtain immunoglobulins from their mothers via the placenta during intrauterine development. However, one should note that the majority of trans-placental transfer of immunoglobulins in humans takes place during the last trimester of pregnancy. It is also known that the feeding of limited amounts of colostrum or systemic infusion of small amounts of serum improves the survival of preterm and full-term piglets. Full-term piglets deprived of their mother's immunoglobulins exhibit strong apathy and develop watery diarrhoea, often resulting in death. The aim of the current study was to determine if provision of immunoglobulins using different approaches would be beneficial for survival outcomes. To reach the immunological sufficient level we infused immunoglobulins intravenously in amount mimicking the blood level in piglets fed with sow colostrum. Intravenous infusion of immunoglobulins in both preterm and full-term newborn piglets fully ensured their survival, growth and blood immunoglobulin G and protein levels similar to those observed in piglets fed colostrum. Piglets completely deprived of immunoglobulins exhibited significantly lower blood levels of immunoglobulins and protein compared to colostrum-fed animals. Piglets infused with only serum exhibited significantly lower blood immunoglobulin G level compared to those infused with immunoglobulins. In conclusion, based on the data obtained, we suggest that passive immune support provided by colostrum intake or early systemic infusion of Ig's in sufficient amounts is key to ensuring the general well-being of preterm and full-term new born piglets, used as an animal model for the human infant.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Colostrum, Immunoglobulin infusion, Pig model, Preterm infants
in
Journal of Biological Regulators and Homeostatic Agents
volume
31
issue
1
pages
6 pages
publisher
Biolife SAS
external identifiers
  • scopus:85016224799
ISSN
0393-974X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
16530701-3f24-4c06-b582-80683d0b88b8
date added to LUP
2017-04-24 13:02:59
date last changed
2017-07-23 05:27:31
@article{16530701-3f24-4c06-b582-80683d0b88b8,
  abstract     = {<p>Preterm human neonates, contrary to preterm piglets, obtain immunoglobulins from their mothers via the placenta during intrauterine development. However, one should note that the majority of trans-placental transfer of immunoglobulins in humans takes place during the last trimester of pregnancy. It is also known that the feeding of limited amounts of colostrum or systemic infusion of small amounts of serum improves the survival of preterm and full-term piglets. Full-term piglets deprived of their mother's immunoglobulins exhibit strong apathy and develop watery diarrhoea, often resulting in death. The aim of the current study was to determine if provision of immunoglobulins using different approaches would be beneficial for survival outcomes. To reach the immunological sufficient level we infused immunoglobulins intravenously in amount mimicking the blood level in piglets fed with sow colostrum. Intravenous infusion of immunoglobulins in both preterm and full-term newborn piglets fully ensured their survival, growth and blood immunoglobulin G and protein levels similar to those observed in piglets fed colostrum. Piglets completely deprived of immunoglobulins exhibited significantly lower blood levels of immunoglobulins and protein compared to colostrum-fed animals. Piglets infused with only serum exhibited significantly lower blood immunoglobulin G level compared to those infused with immunoglobulins. In conclusion, based on the data obtained, we suggest that passive immune support provided by colostrum intake or early systemic infusion of Ig's in sufficient amounts is key to ensuring the general well-being of preterm and full-term new born piglets, used as an animal model for the human infant.</p>},
  author       = {Socha-Banasiak, A. and Pierzynowski, S. and Woliński, J. and Grujic, D. and Boryczka, M. and Grzesiak, P. and Szczurek, P. and Czkwianianc, E. and Westrom, B. and Goncharova, K.},
  issn         = {0393-974X},
  keyword      = {Colostrum,Immunoglobulin infusion,Pig model,Preterm infants},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {87--92},
  publisher    = {Biolife SAS},
  series       = {Journal of Biological Regulators and Homeostatic Agents},
  title        = {The pig as a model for premature infants - The importance of immunoglobulin supplementation for growth and development},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2017},
}